Podcast

Take Note – Michael Gumiela

Michael Gumiela has led the creation and standardization of the ATALIAN Global Services US sales platform. Building the sales platform has allowed Mike to get back to his roots of creating and developing effective sales teams through performance management.

In today’s episode Mike breaks down different aspects of his work at ATALIAN, whether it be hiring practices or sales processes- his 23+ years of facilities management experience has given him extensive familiarity with all things leadership related.

Tune into this week’s episode to learn from someone with an extensive background in sales and facility management.

Watch or listen to this episode:

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Transcript:

Wed, 3/3 12:52PM • 54:03 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS 
sales, crm, people, facilities, customer, janitorial, salespeople, company, pipeline, day, operations, finance, reps, industry, close, sales team, sales process, run, contract, walked 

SPEAKERS 
Michael Gumiela, Christopher Smith 

Intro 
Welcome to the Sales Lead Dog Podcast hosted by CRM technology and sales process expert Christopher Smith, talking with sales leaders that have separated themselves from the rest of the pack. Listen to find out how the best of the best achieve success with their team and CRM technology. And remember, unless you are the lead dog, the view never changes. 

Christopher Smith   
Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. Today we have joining us Mike Gumiela. Mike, welcome to Sales Lead Dog. 

Michael Gumiela   
Thank you Chris, I appreciate you having me on. 

Christopher Smith   
I’m excited to have you here. Mike, tell us a bit about your current role and your company. 

Michael Gumiela   
Um yeah, so I am the Chief Revenue Officer at Italian Global Services United States. It’s pretty interesting, we’re actually relatively new to the US. We’ve been here about four years, going on our fifth year. We are part of the Italian Global Services umbrella which is roughly about a $3.5 billion a year company, and the main, you know, our industry is facilities management. So when you think about, you know, large buildings, you know, whether they be in a large city setting or a you know a rural setting with distribution or manufacturing, you know those buildings need to be maintained. Those facilities have several huge working pieces, from janitorial to mechanical, HVAC to security, energy management is a big one that’s popping up these days for us, concierge services. So we really tie all of that together under one umbrella, and here in the US, our, you know, our biggest percentage of service that we provide right now is janitorial with security and mechanical HVAC coming in a very, you know, close second and third, so it’s it’s been a, it’s been a fun ride. I’ve been here, I’m going on three years. When I walked in the door we didn’t have much of a sales organization at all. And for the last year or two we’ve really been, you know, kind of bringing everybody in the US under the same umbrella. The Italian way of expansion is by purchasing companies, often typically family-owned businesses that have built up over the years and have established great contacts, a great service reputation. And, you know, we let those companies, you know, run through their ownership process and their, their handoff if you will. And then now we’re all we’re transitioning under the Italian global banner if you will. So it’s a lot of a lot of a lot of fun stuff, but a little bit of boring stuff too, you know organizing everybody under the same financial systems. The fun stuff is exposing people to, you know, the CRM, the sales process, all those things. So yeah, we’re, we’re growing pretty quickly right now. I know 2020 was a was a scary year for a lot of folks, we were able to really take care of a lot of our customers in the janitorial realm, we were a little bit ahead of the curve with electrostatic spray disinfection, and we were able to keep a lot of our manufacturing and distribution customers, you know, moving along with, you know, healthy and safe employees and and you know products that they were putting out to be honest. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, you know, that’s why I was excited to have you on the show. You know, one, just the size and scope of your company is amazing. But it’s also the services that you guys provide. For all of us that go to work, it’s not something most people probably even think about, but it is so important to us being able to do our jobs. So it’s great to have you on here. Tell me about, thinking back over your career, the three things that have really contributed to your success.  

Michael Gumiela   
Sure, I was, you know, coming out of college many years ago. I was, I went into inside sales, and one of the biggest things that, you know, the first day that I showed up for work was hey here’s you know I had a mentor, Jennifer Carol, that told me, “You’ve got to plan every day.” Then you know a plan is only good if you execute it. So it was planning, execute that activity, and then lastly was follow up with persistence, right? So you know with that plan and with that activity, you’re going to figure out who you want to do business with. Follow up with those people and be professionally aggressive you know until they sign a contract with you. I get it, I know that, you know, sometimes we’re, you know, we’re gonna make a great sales pitch, and we’re gonna do you know we’re gonna make that you know test close and then we’re going to make the assumptive close, and we’re not going to win the business. You know, I get that. I understand that, and I think, you know, the important part is just because you weren’t picked you know today, doesn’t mean that when that contract runs its course or, you know, even if it doesn’t run that course, you know, don’t give up if that’s a customer that you want. So, you know definitely planning, activity, and then follow-up. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. That’s awesome. We’re gonna loop back later on when we talk about CRM about your comment about, you know, when you lose a contract or don’t win that contract, following up with them later on. We’re gonna, I’m gonna put a pin in that.  

Michael Gumiela   
Okay, sounds good.  

Christopher Smith   
So tell us about your, your start in sales. What was your first sales job? 

Michael Gumiela   
First sales job was with a franchise cleaning company, a Coverall health-based cleaning system. And that was very, very transactional, very hit and run. It was you know, it wasn’t as hardcore as you know the the big, you know, urban legend in the sales industry is you know copy your sales, give me someone who was successful at, you know, old school copier sales. We were pretty darn close, you know, we had our territories and it was, you know, our main targets were strip malls and, you know, doctors, professional buildings, things of that nature. And you really did have to, you know, you had to plan on what you were going to do every day because, you know, there wasn’t a whole heck of a lot of email. I think we had, you know five sales reps shared the same laptop, and we could all come into the office on a different day. You know and I don’t want to sound like my dad you know, “I walked uphill both ways to school in the winter.” But, you know, really it was a janitorial company so you know our old CEO used to say, “Do you know how many toilets we have to clean to buy one of those laptops?” Um, so it was a lot of in the field. It was a lot of legitimate old school cold calling and then once you were able to get in and offer a proposal and you know give your value statement and pitch like all of us salespeople like to do, and try and close, you know nobody could very well sign a contract on the spot, even though, you know, our average size deal was maybe $600 a month. So then, you know, we’d have to go back to the office and it was just that crazy follow up on the phone. So that was my original, you know, and I say my original you know I was with Coverall for 19 years. So, I, I loved it, and I and I moved up into, you know, management and into some lead roles, even you know dabbled a little bit in operations, but you know it’s, it’s the same you know at Coverall you’re, you know, we used to go after accounts, or I’m sorry, at Coverall we used to go after accounts that were, you know, 5000, square feet. Well now you know at Italian, we’re not even looking at accounts unless they’re half a million square feet. But I will tell you, it’s the same game. It’s, you got to plan it, you got to execute that plan and make sure your activity gets done, and then you know once you find somebody who can use your service, it’s the follow up and the persistence. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. That’s awesome. Do you have a crazy or funny sales story from that time? 

Michael Gumiela   
Yeah, you know what I actually do. You know, the name of the company was Coverall. And you know, as salespeople, we always try when we’re when we’re trying to book our appointments you know you don’t want to say too much. You want to book the appointment, you want to get in there, because you know we’re all better face-to-face. So, the company was Coverall. I walked into a facility, I sat down, and, and I was in the discovery phase and I was, you know, if we’re going to talk about baseline selling at all which was our book at the time, you know I was at first base, so I was in discovery. And I think I talked to this gentleman for roughly 30 to 45 minutes. We were having a great conversation and it was going and I was asking facility-specific questions and then finally we came to that, you know, that pause for the next step. And the guy got up and he walked over to me and he held out his arms and he said, “Okay, you can measure me now.” And the funny part about that is I wasn’t selling coverall right, I wasn’t selling coveralls, I was selling commercial cleaning, so apparently my discovery period and, you know, and my questions that I asked weren’t very good. So needless to say, you know, I started you know that was a really funny story but it was also like geez Mike What the heck are you doing that this guy didn’t even know you. you know you you are selling the cleaning service. So that’s my story. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh my, you could’ve sold, you could’ve made it if you were selling coveralls. 

Michael Gumiela   
Yeah. Right, exactly. So, yeah, that’s a, that’s a good one, I tell quite a few of my sales reps that. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s when you come out of, and you’re just shaking your head going “Oh my, what just happened?” 

Michael Gumiela   
Oh I was, I already had that account on my hotlist that I was going to close it. No ifs ands or buts about it. I hadn’t even given them a price or a work spec, obviously. 

Christopher Smith   
Right, right. That’s awesome. So tell me about your transition from salesperson to sales leader. What was that like for you? 

Michael Gumiela   
Um, you know, it was, you know, a lot, a lot of times folks say that, you know, success is largely a matter of hanging on after everybody else has let go. So, you know, we went through Coverall, in my time there we went through for private equity purchases. So every time we had a private equity purchase, it was almost like you know top-level leadership was not flushed out, because we were always a very solid company, but you know they moved on to something. And it just kind of seemed like I was, I was not the number one sales rep in the office. I was typically the number two or number three out of, you know, eight to ten. And, you know, it was one of those things where the top reps were like I’m not managing anybody. And you know the the Regional Director at the time came to me and said you know you, “You’re a college athlete, you do the right things, you always have, you know, your ducks in a row. Have you ever thought about leadership?” And I said, “I, you know, all the time I think about it,” and they said, “Well I want you to jump into this. Read, you know, read the Game of Work and get started.” So it was a kind of a crazy, you know, it was a little bit of a crazy transition. I had no idea what I was doing and I was, you know, given a great book, but I just, I don’t want to say it was natural you know just naturally, got into that leadership and there are a couple of, you know, principles that I had just learned growing up that I applied to sales reps.  

Christopher Smith   
Right. That’s awesome. Thinking back to that start, is there something that you wish you knew then that you know now that could have changed things or made it better? 

Michael Gumiela   
Um, yeah, I you know the the technology aspect, the business intelligence. I know we’re gonna talk a little bit about CRM here in a little bit as well, but you know we didn’t have any of those things and, and, you know, we worked out of a three inch binder, with a 1 to 30, you know, tabbed system where hey, if I had to call somebody on the 15th, I took the three hole punch, I put my info sheet in it, and I, and I inserted it in, you know, behind the 15 tab. Yeah, if the technology part of it was there, I mean, oh man, you know, it would have been, we were successful, but boy oh boy, I think we could have definitely rewritten some record books. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh, that’s awesome. Tell me about, you you mentioned, you know, building a team with where you’re at now. What is your approach to building a successful sales team, how do you do it? 

Michael Gumiela   
So, you know, I think a lot of people just want to have a ton of superstars on the team, right? They want to have, I want all the number ones on my team and I, I just don’t think that’s possible. So there are certain things that I look for, you know I look for that, that small group that is that I’m going to do whatever it takes. And I’m going to be you know kind of this gunslinger, but I’m going to be your number one. That’s super important to have, but I can’t have a full team of that. It just, it, it’ll never work out positively. So what I look at is, I look for, I look for, you know, a small group of those, you know, crazy type-A people, which I love. And then more so what I look for are you know the person who has it in their DNA to work hard and stay organized, because you know anybody can put a plan together, anybody can follow up. The activity part in the middle of kind of that three step, you know, those three things that I think made me a good sales rep and a good sales manager, um, you know, if you don’t, if you can’t go eight hours a day, and, you know, you know dialing the phone somedays. That’s a tough gig man. That’s eight hours of, you know, if you get hung up on 98 times, that’s a good day because that means you talked to two people, you know, and so I get those people that are I like, I like to look for people that first and foremost have a great personality, don’t take themselves too seriously, things I can find in their resume show me that they’ve hustled throughout their career, you know, were they a waiter or waitress when they were in college, right? What extracurriculars did they do in college? You know, did they come up through, you know what typical sales organization that has a great training program like you know let’s say maybe an enterprise or, you know, in the old school days all the canon, something like that, but I look for just that, you know, the blue collar guy or girl, the person who’s gonna bust their butt and, you know, has a great personality about it because you know, sales is hard. You know, it’s that, it’s that roller coaster, that up and down and you know you can have three great days in a row, but you know your number one hotlist account could call you on that fourth day, and you know the decision-making process is done, they’ve gone with somebody else or they’ve postponed it, and now you’re down in the dumps. So you’ve got to have, you’ve got to have that stick-to-it-iveness and you you have to have that work ethic that you’re going to get your activity rolling so you can execute your plan. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. Let’s talk a little bit about sales process. How important is this structured sales process to your, to how you sell? 

Michael Gumiela   
it, it’s extremely important. You know, we start with and we have checklists for our new hires and for our existing reps that exist in our sales playbook. And it’s important because, you know, I don’t want the exact, I don’t want an army of 35 robots going out into the field right? Where I want my team robotic is in the questions they ask, the proposals they design, the solutions they design, and you do all that with a sales process. I don’t need someone thinking like, “Oh my god do I call so and so now?” Refer back to your process, figure it out. What is your you know, what’s on your calendar today? You know, a week and a half ago when you had, you know, a conversation on, you know, “Hey, is this going to close?” Can I answer questions about your proposal?” You know, why did you put today in as a reminder in the CRM to call this customer? I have to take that away and sales process does that, because this is a, it’s a hard job, selling is hard. So I need you to be robotic in that fashion but not when you’re sitting in front of the customer, when you’re sitting in front of the customer man, you got to, you have to connect with them and you have to, you know, I don’t get into a lot of them, you know mimic your customer and those types of things but you know people buy from people they like. So it’s one of those things where I need you to be relaxed when you’re in there in discovery. You know, gaining agreement, test closing, that’s got to be natural, that can’t be off of a script. But the process is your script for how you do every other thing, and when you’re a sales rep and you don’t have to worry about paperwork or, you know, working with operations, because man I’m going down the list, I’m checking it off, process has to be there. And I don’t think you can run a successful sales organization without a well-thought-out from all sides, you know, sales process has to be built by sales, by finance, by operations. It’s got to be a group effort to make sure everybody gets what they need. I hope that makes sense. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh no, it does and I love that. A lot of times people like think hinder themselves by thinking sales process is just with the, the sales team. But the truly successful companies are doing what you said, they’re bringing in finance, they’re bringing in operations. Can you talk about how you do that, or how, you know, if a listener’s like hey, I need to do that, what advice would you give to them about how you pull finance, how you pull operations into your sales process? 

Michael Gumiela   
Sure. And I think what it is is you’ve got to establish that open communication from the first day, you know that you walk into an organization as a salesperson. And that starts and you know what, even if you’ve been there for two years and you want to change how something is going, you’ve got to engage with those people, you know whether you go through your manager or you go through, you know, the finance manager, who that whoever that might be or the operations manager, because, you know, we all know that you know hey in the org you know, finance always says we underbid it, operations always says we can execute it. That’s the same everywhere. But being in facilities and having to build some of these work schedules, it’s forced on folks in this industry that I can’t put my proposal together without operations, I can’t put it together without finance. So, my, my advice would be engage those folks, show them a bid, show them your customer list like, “Hey you know I’m going after these 25 guys.” Sit down with your main operator whoever that may be and say, “Hey, what do you think about these facilities or these types of customers?” Once they’re done, you know, break it down a little further with geography and type of businessmen sit down with finance and say, “Hey, what you know how do we really, you know, how do we successfully put together pricing for a customer like this?” Because if you don’t start that communication, it’s never gonna happen. You know, we’re supposed to be the folks who you can drop off into a room full of 100 people and we walk out with 97 friends.  

Christopher Smith   
Right 

Michael Gumiela   
Right? So that would be my recommendation to anybody. And you don’t have to be new in the org, you know, like I said you could be there for two years, engage them, because you know sales is the engine that makes everything run. You know, finance wants sales, ops wants sales. So let’s let’s include them, you know and I can’t tell you how many times we’ve closed business by bringing an operator in with us, and that operator really tells that potential customer how involved they were, and customers get you know potential customers get impressed with that. 

Christopher Smith   
Right, right. Do you does finance and operations actually participate in your pipeline meetings? Do they have any say in that? 

Michael Gumiela   
Well, not on a, not on a weekly basis, right, because we review pipeline on, I like to think that I’m not a micromanager at all. I think a lot of my folks would say I’m not either. But, you know, we talk about pipeline pretty much every time we’re on the phone, so I don’t find a need for us to do it, other than maybe weekly or bi weekly. However, my counterpart, my Chief Operating Officer and I, every two weeks we have that pipeline review with our regional vice presidents who are the true, you know, those are the folks that make it happen, and we will pull the sales reps on those calls and we’ll talk about what we’re going after. Sometimes they’re, they’re long calls, because we have you know several new things. Sometimes they’re very short, because it’s just a quick run-through of maybe what we talked about two weeks ago. But yeah, um, finance is and finance is involved with every bid we do. I, we have bid support and it’s really, it’s pricing support. In the facilities industry, you know I’m not, I’m not selling software, I’m selling mainly our labor. And we’re, you know, and we, you know, as salespeople, we aren’t always the best with numbers and analysis, so we have a team of people who help us with our pricing, so they’re always in the mix and I’ll tell you what, when they feel comfortable with you, and they feel you’ve answered the questions, and they feel comfortable with what they’re looking at. That’s amazing how creative they can be and how they can help close business as well. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Let’s talk about CRM. Do you love it, or do you hate it? 

Michael Gumiela   
Ah, love it and can’t live without it. 

 Christopher Smith   
Great answer. 

Michael Gumiela   
If you took it away from somebody, if you took it away from me, I’m not grabbing that three-inch, you know, three ring binder and going back to the 1 to 30 filing system. No way. 

Christopher Smith   
Right, yeah. No way. You mentioned before, early on, and I said we’re gonna come back to it so here we go, where you lose a dea and you know, hey, that contract is gonna be up, you know, on such and such a date. How do you, leveraging CRM, how do you pull that into your pipeline again or, you know, make sure that that doesn’t fall through the cracks? 

Michael Gumiela   
Sure. Well, it, it starts with taking great notes every time that you meet with a customer, anytime that you are the prospect. Anytime you meet with the prospect, anytime you are on the phone with them, if you trade emails, I would hope that everybody listening to this is saving those transactions into your CRM, right? And then, you know, in our, you know I think every industry probably when you lose a bid, and a new vendor is brought in. I think every industry probably has a rule of when you should check in just to make sure the other guy is following through. So for us, it’s typically, for you know facilities, it’s 30 days. I mean you’re gonna know if the company you chose can get the job done in 30 to 60 days. So what you do is you know obviously you utilize the reminders, you utilize your calendar and your notes, because I’m, from the day that I find out we’re gonna you know we didn’t win it, I’m gonna find, you know I’ve got a great relationship with the prospect, so I want to know “Hey, what’s your start date? I’m just, you know, I’m just curious” and I’ll tell them sometimes, I’ll say, “You know, I’m gonna check in with you after a certain period of time and you know just see how it’s going, because you know we’re always here for you.” So that’s how I use CRM. No when that date pops up, where I’m going to call them, you know, depending on your memory, I will go through and just scroll right on the screen and go through every single note, I’ll look at the proposal, I’ll look at my notes on who they went with, when the start date is, just so it’s fresh in my head, and then you know and then you dial the phone. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I love that. You know a big part of sales is rejection. And we touched a little bit here on on your approach with with when you lose a bid, but CRM I think is a great tool for retrospectives around the deals not only that you won, but the deals you lost. How do you guys leverage CRM to create a learning opportunity for your sales team? 

Michael Gumiela   
Yeah. Well, once you get past, when you lose an opportunity and you get past, let’s just say you know unfortunately your competitor does a great job. Well in your discovery process or your discovery period, you know how long that contract is for. So what do we do? We touch base with them at certain key dates and we use CRM to make sure that we don’t forget to touch base during those key dates, you know, we know in our industry that it takes somebody typically about 90 days to run an RFP process, sometimes shorter, sometimes longer, but 90 days is a good indicator. So we go 180 days before the contract is over, because we want to be fresh in their head. While I’m making that 180 day call, I’ve already got a 90 day call, because I want to be there to be included in that RFP or in that opportunity, whatever it may be. And so right there, CRM has got, you know, the two most important calls once I’ve lost something. The other thing in, in dealing with rejection a little bit is CRM always gives you a good, a good view of your pipeline. And I will tell you what. The reps that take a loss harder than, than most do are the ones who don’t have anything in their pipeline where they can’t say well, you know what, I’ve got 87 other opportunities that are coming to in the next, you know, 20 to 30 days, I’m gonna pick that up. So, you know, you’ve got to really cover yourself and make sure you have a pipeline, so when you lose something, it doesn’t completely destroy you. But yeah, it stinks. Nobody likes, nobody likes being told no, but it’s a heck of a lot easier when you’ve got a very healthy, diverse pipeline and, you know, diversity is you know you you figure that out based on your industry. For us, it’s a number of different sized facilities. It’s a number of different RFPs, it’s having, you know, non-RFPs or private opportunities as well. So yeah, there’s, you know there’s two ways, you’ll never forget to follow up with CRM and you always get to look at your pipeline. So when you think the world is ending because you didn’t close ABC Company, you get to look at that pipe and think, “Hey man, I’m not out of the game. I got a, I got a couple more at bats.”  

Christopher Smith   
That’s right, that’s right. What is your biggest struggle with CRM today? 

Michael Gumiela   
It’s you know, if any of my sales reps listen to this, they’re gonna they’re gonna get mad at me, but it’s, you know, I’m and I think that people listening know it’s not using it every single day. “I was, I was so busy today I’ll update all my CRM stuff tomorrow.” Well, why don’t you update it as you go, that way you don’t have to waste all day tomorrow? That’s, that’s my biggest struggle, and I’ve got a great sales team, I do. And I’m very happy with them but, you know, data integrity, don’t enter your information next week. If you did it today, gosh, these CRMs are so easy to enter notes into and schedule calls. You can do it all with you, you know, within two to three minutes, and you know us as salespeople, you know, managing us is like herding cats sometimes. We all have a little bit of that wander in us, right? Oh, I gotta run some errands, or oh, I gotta stop here. Oh, well I’ve definitely got to check LinkedIn today. You know, so it’s it’s timely data entry and it’s data integrity from from my own people. 

Christopher Smith   
Yep, yep. Why do you think salespeople are so, I mean I’m sure you have some of this, why do you think they, they are so resistant to doing those daily activities as they go? 

Michael Gumiela   
Very easy, because it’s boring. And I honestly don’t think it’s anything more than that, you know you’re in sales because you like the you know you like the thrill, you like the chase, you like the hunt. And sitting down and you know typing on a computer isn’t, it’s not a whole lot of fun. It’s not a very, you know you’re it’s it’s not a, it’s not bringing anything immediately to me like if somebody answers the phone when I’m talking on my phone. So I truly do think that’s what it is, it’s a little, a little boring. That would be my number one opinion. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. I think you’re right. It’s not the fun part, by any stretch. Yeah, well we’re coming up on our time here on Sales Lead Dog. I love sitting here listening to you. If people want to reach out and connect with you, Mike, what’s the best way for them to do that? 

Michael Gumiela   
Yeah. The best way is LinkedIn actually, Michael Gumiela. You can find me on LinkedIn under Italian Global Services US. Yeah, if you’ve got questions, you know, anything, you just want to connect, by all means I’m, I’m up for it. You never know what you’re going to run into. 

Christopher Smith   
Are you guys hiring? 

Michael Gumiela   
Ah, you know what we are always hiring and the good thing is, you know I like hearing from ex-operators who are interested in sales. I have several ex-operators right now who kind of fit the bill of that hard worker activity person. So yeah, operators for sales, operations. Yeah, definitely reach out. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Well thank you for coming on Sales Lead Dog, it’s been terrific. 

Michael Gumiela   
Thank you. 

Outro 
As we end this discussion on Sales Lead Dog, be sure to subscribe to catch all our episodes on social media. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. Watch the videos on YouTube, and you can also find our episodes on our website at Empellorcrm.com/salesleaddog. Sales Lead Dog is supported by Empellor CRM, delivering objectively better CRM for business guaranteed. 

Quotes

  • “I like to look for people that first and foremost have a great personality don’t take themselves too seriously. Things I can find in their resume, show me that they’ve hustled throughout their career, you know, were they a waiter or a waitress? When they were in college? Right? What extracurriculars did they do in college?” (21:16-21:31)
  • “Sure, well, it, it starts with taking great notes, every time that you meet with the customer. Anytime that you are the prospect, anytime you meet with the prospect anytime you are on the phone with them, if you trade emails, I would hope that everybody listening to this is saving those transactions into your CRM, right.” (30:16-30:39)
  • “You know, sales process has to be built by sales, by finance by operations. It’s got to be a group effort to make sure everybody gets what they need.” (26:18-26:24)

Links

Michael Gumiela: LinkedIn
ATALIAN Global Services: LinkedIn
ATALIAN Global Services Website

Empellor CRM LinkedIn
Empellor CRM Website