Podcast

Extend Grace & Accept It – Sandy Ellis

Sandy Ellis is the Chief Revenue Officer for Activus Connect- a premium provider of customer experience outsourced solutions that operates across the Continental US & Puerto Rico.

Sandy describes herself as an executive with a talent to discover underlying business needs, strategically design innovative solutions, and develop and inspire leaders through career development, professional writing, and speaking.

On today’s episode, Sandy dives into some of the tough lessons she had to learn in order to better connect with her team and her clients. “As a leader, I think it’s important to learn that life is intermingled and being able to figure out how to embrace that and build upon it, versus fighting it will save you a lot of angst.”

Tune into today’s episode to learn from our conversation with a wise, self-aware leader!

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Transcript:

Wed, 6/30 13:59:34 • 47:36 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS 
sales, clients, business, prospect, opportunity, role, capture, operations, strategy, deliver, life, service delivery, leader, people, service, career, customer, organization, transition, employees 

SPEAKERS 
Sandy Ellis, Christopher Smith 

Intro 
Welcome to the Sales Lead Dog Podcast hosted by CRM technology and sales process expert Christopher Smith, talking with sales leaders that have separated themselves from the rest of the pack. Listen to find out how the best of the best achieve success with their team and CRM technology. And remember, unless you are the lead dog, the view never changes. 

Christopher Smith   
Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. Today, I have joining us on the podcast Sandy Ellis of Activus Connect. Sandy, welcome to Sales Lead Dog.  

Sandy Ellis   
Thank you, Chris. It’s great to be a part of the pack.  

Christopher Smith   
That’s right. I’m excited to have you as part of the pack, Sandy, tell us about your current role and Activus Connect.  

Sandy Ellis   
Wow, I’m glad that we get to start there, because I recently joined the organization as the Chief Revenue Officer, and it was a journey and a lot of conversations and discovery around Activus Connect on whether that was the next step that I wanted to take in my career journey. And I had the opportunity to really get behind the scenes of what makes that company so special, and the more that I learned, the more that I was intrigued and wanted to learn more, and then that advanced into wanting to be a part of the leadership team as they go through really an aggressive part of their growth strategy. Specifically what really drew me to Activus Connect is when you just boil it all down, they’re really good stewards on behalf of not only their, not only their employees, which we call ambassadors, but also with their clients and their customers, and the local communities in which our employees work, our ambassadors work. When you look at those three foundational pillars, it just creates some amazing outcomes, and those outcomes include having 100% of the client portfolio being promoters of the brand, and that’s unheard of in the service delivery business.  

Christopher Smith   
That’s amazing.  

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, yeah. And then in addition to that, the three years into our, our journey as a company, and we’ve won “Great Place to Work” two years running, but 93% of our employees say it’s a great place to work, another unheard of statistic in the service delivery, another unheard of statistic in the service delivery world. So those were very intriguing components that I wanted to learn more and be a part of that. 

Christopher Smith   
That really speaks to your culture, which I think is an often overlooked component of leadership, you know, I know people talk about oh, we have a great culture and all that, but to actually execute and create a great culture? That’s totally different. Could you talk a little bit more about how you guys, your strategy around executing and creating that culture? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah absolutely. Activus Connect was founded as a 100% work-from-home service provider. So, we’re three years into it, we’ve been in that model and that is the model and will always be the model of the organization. So it was like many of our competitors, really had to sort of base to make. We were already there, that’s how the company was founded. Because we founded that model, we were able to, to create what we call smart virtual, and that’s a set of technologies, processes and people that lead to that consistent delivery of service. So I mentioned earlier 100% of our clients are promoters for our brand. It’s because we’re able to deliver a high quality of service consistently, and we do that through that smart virtual platform. So having all of those components work together by design, it gives us that consistent outcome. And we, for example, are able to tap into a workforce that are in their late 30s, early 40s, they have 10 plus years of customer service experience, and then they’re at a point in their life where they want to work from home, but really still be able to provide a high level, and that either being as an ambassador or within one of the support roles within our organization or as a leader. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s great. You know, my workforce is 100% remote, it’s also been that way from day one. And we use that as a tool to recruit really incredibly talented people. You guys leveraging that, it sounds like you guys are really leveraging that as a terrific, I don’t want to say hook, but as an enticement to attract those people. 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, absolutely. It’s really interesting that we’re hearing a lot from not only our existing clients, but prospective clients that it is just a really tough environment to hire and maintain employees right now. And we simply aren’t seeing that. We are able to not only exceed all of our fill rates, but we’re able to attract from across the United States, we’re primarily domestic in the United States and Puerto Rico, and we’re able to attract and design our support structure on behalf of what the client needs, based on both geography as well as skills, and tap into the millions of Americans that want to be able to work from home and have chosen to do that. It’s not for everyone, but there are millions of people out there that have worked very well for. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s awesome. What are the three things, looking back over your career, the three things that have really contributed to your success? 

Sandy Ellis   
I love that question. I love that question, because I think as soon as you can really tap into who you are as a person, your God-given talents, and you understand what those are and you’re able to understand what energizes you, then you can start mapping out or designing what your life looks like. And of course you have to be able to pivot and transition along the way, because we all know that the life journey is not a straight line. It takes, there’s many twists and turns and, and bends. But each one of those are an opportunity to learn something new, to expand your network, and to open up another opportunity or another area that you may not have considered without that journey. So one, really understanding who you are as an individual and being in tune with that. And the second part of that, the second component is designing your life in what energizes you, you. I look forward to going to work because I know what I’m going to do means something to those that I’m working with and for, and also it just, it’s fun. I’m having fun, and I’ve always been very fortunate that the job that I’m in, I’ve always thought is the best job that I’ve had. So as I continue to add experiences and skills. I’m able to just build on that, and when I start losing personally, I start losing that energy or that enthusiasm, I know that’s, I need to be in tune with my own internal compass, and it’s telling me it’s probably time to make a change. And then I would say the third thing is, I learned early in my career to extend grace and accept grace, give myself that. So from a standpoint of everything does not go as planned, as in life is messy, things happen, but being able to know that the complexities of life and the people that you’re working with and influencing and being able to get to a human level with individuals and help them be successful, whether it’s on your team or somewhere else, that just leaves a lot of opportunity for great things to happen, not only for, for me personally, but those that I have the opportunity to influence. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s great. I love that answer. What a terrific answer. It tells us a lot about who you are as a person. Thank you. That’s awesome. How did you get your start in sales? 

Sandy Ellis   
Probably not the common way. So I actually started in operations. I fell in love with the service industry and the customer experience more than a couple of decades ago. Let’s just leave it at that. On the operational side, I was a leader for an internal contact center for a financial services company, and I absolutely fell in love with working with a large amount of people that were all tied to delivering on a strategy of an organization. And that’s where I learned where you can really ensure that individual professional goals are aligned with strategically what the business needs to accomplish, and being able to influence excellent customer experiences by being able to create a vision within your team and those that you influence, and then putting together actions right to be able to execute on that vision. So the operational execution component of it was key to really understanding that customer journey and the operations, service operations that need to be created to deliver on an excellent customer journey that’s going to develop brand champions. Then I was able to continue to add building blocks into my career if you will, and I went from a financial services client to the BPO world, business process outsourcing, and ran operations across North America from across many sites for many different clients. That gave me exposure to how different industries and different clients within those industries executed on behalf of their business strategy, how BPO is played into that service delivery, and how you can influence as a third party or third, third party partner still delivering on excellent customer service. And sometimes we’ve been feeding what the organization can do internally, because you’re focused on service delivery alone. But being able to take that responsibility from a client and really, really ensure that you’re, you’re delivering the experience that they expect was key in my overall learning in how to then transition into the sales, sales world. So as a sales leader, then I started supporting a portfolio of existing clients within a multibillion dollar global BPO, and being able to grow that revenue base based on trusted relationships, right, knowing that I knew their business and if I didn’t know it, I would learn it and provide opportunities on how we can even improve it based on the experience and exposure that in that particular world you get, you know, the unique exposure to many clients across many different industries. So being able to share some of those best practices, if you will, that work well to deliver the outcomes that your clients are looking for. And then one more building block, then being able to add, you know, the integrated growth marketing and brand strategies in my current role as Chief Revenue Officer at Activus Connect on top of the sales and operational discipline. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I would imagine, you know a lot of the CEOs I talk with, they follow the more traditional route of coming from sales, you know, progressing from a VP of Sales to CRO. And they struggle a bit with now they have responsibility for strategy, for operations, or at least being able to interface with the operations team, as well as marketing. Was that a difficult transition for you to go from your operations background in sales into a CRO role or was that an easier transition do you think for you? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, I’m gonna answer that slightly differently. I think it was a it was a gift that I was able to transition into sales and that way. And the reason I say it was a gift, although it’s very challenging at times, it was incredibly rewarding to be able to, to be able to understand from a client to sales perspective what they needed to accomplish and why. The underlying needs, right? And that doesn’t always come out in the sales process. So understanding and being responsible for delivering on top of being able to deliver operational execution, it provides you with that insight of what a client or a prospect, really is asking for, even though that may not come out in, in the initial sales conversation or early in the sales process. But being able to very quickly be in tune with what they need to accomplish and why, and that can vary depending on the level within the organization that you’re talking to, talking to. But everyone usually has a key component to the overall corporate strategy, but they may have just different ideas on how to achieve that. And understanding that complexity, and being able to really map out the product or service that’s going to not only meet that need, but provide an opportunity for that person to be a champion internally, and to, you know, be able to promote your company as a solution to not only what they’re trying to solve for immediately, but some of the bigger strategic means. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. If I’m a sales leader and, and I’m looking to expand my team, why should I look at the operations team for potential resources? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah. They, they know the product or service inside and out, but they also are the closest person, the closest group to the voice of the customer. So they are hearing from the customer what is working well, what’s not working well, opportunities for continuous improvement in either the product or service, but their wealth of knowledge and being able to tap into that and then overlay that into meeting needs, current needs as well as future needs. It’s just, I think an untapped reservoir of talent within the operational world, and they’re also usually, generally, generally relationship-oriented. And to me, the sales is I wish we could almost rename it to education, because you’re, you’re, you’re not selling, you’re educating your target prospect or your existing client on why your product or service is irresistible to them and why they need it in order to be successful. And you have to be passionate about that, right, either if you’re not passionate about what you’re you’re selling, then you’re one, not in the right place. Or it perhaps is not the right role for you, because you really are educating why that individual or business needs your product or service. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, and there’s nothing like that experience you’ve gained from having filling those shoes and feeling the pain that they have felt and being able to share that with them during that, you know, during the sales process as you’re saying. 

Sandy Ellis   
Right, and being honest about it, right? They’re going to know whether you really believe in the product or service or you’ve just been to some fancy sales training and know how to talk, right? That is, that’s so old school and it’s just really, I think a benefit of what’s happened in our world over the last 18 months is that everything is boiled down to human relationships. And if you’re able to connect in a really trusted, value-based relationship, then you can decide very quickly whether your product or service is right for that individual or business. And if it’s not, your network has expanded, and you move on. But if it’s a right fit, then you can articulate why it’s the right fit and why it will help that individual with accomplishing what they need to accomplish. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. Thinking back over your sales career, do you have a funny or crazy story that you can share with us? 

Sandy Ellis   
Well I think there’s an unwritten rule that you know as I was just mentioning when you’re with, with clients or prospects, it really does come down to a human relationship, right? So there can, there can be some crazy things that happen when you’re traveling around the world, but with prospects or clients. So I’m going to go the safe route, and I’m going to share with you a really recent experience that I had that was, was a little surprising, but it just reinforced to me that you have to be real and authentic throughout your life and your personal life, your professional life, really have in my, at least in my case become interwoven. Right? So that, my story is that I had a hot prospect that I’m working right now that early morning FaceTime called me on my phone. And after I got over the shock, I did a quick mental check on, okay, dressed, my hair’s brushed, and I’m pretty sure I don’t have anything sticking out of my teeth before I answered the phone. But after I went through that, like the mental checklist, and you know ended up having a great productive conversation based on his channel of choice, you know, early morning, he was on the East Coast and I wasn’t. But it all worked out, but it was surprising, that was my first time that a prospect have actually FaceTimed me. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh yeah, that’s, I’ve never heard of that, that’s crazy.  

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, happened two weeks ago. It was all okay, hair was brushed, I had nothing sticking out of my teeth that I know of. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh man, that’s like, because you think FaceTime, it’s like someone in your family or close friend. I would never think of a business prospect, especially a sales prospect, hitting me up on FaceTime.  

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah. It was surprising but it just reinforced to me that everything is blended now. It’s relationship-based, whether you’re talking to a family friend or prospective client in my case. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, and that also demonstrates a level of comfort that they must have with you personally to say, “I’m gonna reach out and just say hey, let’s talk.” 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, yeah, it worked out well and it was past 6:30, so I’d had a cup of coffee and I could actually articulate in sentences, but it was good. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh yeah, yeah well. Transitioning to talk about sales leadership, what advice do you have for someone who’s just in that their first sales leadership role? 

Sandy Ellis   
I would, my advice is to really expand your perspective on your role. If you have come from operations, a sales contributor position, or support role but you’re now in a sales leadership role, it’s really expanding your perspective that now you, you have expanded roles and responsibilities on delivering on behalf of the strategy of your organization. And in almost every situation, actually I can’t think of one where this isn’t true, that in a sales leadership role, you are really responsible for protecting jobs and creating jobs, whether it be within your own organization or on behalf of your clients. And that’s a pretty hefty responsibility when you really think through that, that you’re you’re talking about people and family and their livelihoods. And that, in your role as a leader, to be able to create a strategy and influence those that are within your team to be able to execute on that strategy, and that comes down to personal relationships with them and understanding with each team member, understanding where their skills are, and how as a leader, you can help them to develop skills, give them additional exposure, and give them opportunities to shine. You’re only as successful as your team. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. Is there something you wish you would have been taught when you accepted your first sales leadership role? 

Sandy Ellis   
You know, we touched on this, but I think I wish I would have known much earlier in my career that you don’t have to segment your life. And what I mean by that is, I used to really pride myself almost embarrassingly so that when I was at work, I was all professional. It was all, all work, right? And when I was at home with my family, it was all mom, wife, sister, daughter time, right? It was, and I kept them separate, whereas I wished I would have learned the power of just being human and having those connections and being focused and intentional with whatever you’re in at the moment, but not keeping everything separate. I think I spent a lot of unnecessary time and energy and probably self-induced stress in trying to keep things segmented within my life. So, as a leader, regardless of the sales or anything else, I think it’s important to learn that life is intermingled, right? And being able to figure out how to embrace that and build upon it, versus fighting it will save you a lot of angst. 

Christopher Smith   
You have to be vulnerable to do that too, you have to open yourself up a bit and say, “Hey, I’m human. I have stuff that’s happening in my world.” Oh yeah, and also you have to be brave enough to set those boundaries and, and stick to them, which can be tough at times, but it’s, I think it’s really important to, to maintain that balance in your life overall. 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, you know, and that’s interesting that you mentioned that, because I reconnected with a colleague and leader that I hadn’t spoken to in over 10 years, and she shared with me a story of that when she first met me, she was a human resource director, and she was actually interviewing me for a position, and the interview was running late, and and I shared with her at that time that I needed to, to end our conversation, because it was now my family time and, and offered to follow up and have an additional conversation. I don’t recall that at all, but she says that she still uses that as an example in her, in her world today of just really understanding what’s important at the moment and being clear on your priorities, but, but willing to set boundaries, right? So I just share that with you because it was interesting as you advance in your career that you, it’s a wonderful time when you have individuals that you’ve worked with in the past that are willing to share those stories. Right, right. And I must have done something right because I did get that position. That’s how we developed the relationship, so. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, yeah, that’s good. What were some of the mistakes you made early on in your career as a sales leader? 

Sandy Ellis   
Hmm, mistakes or failures, whatever you want to call them, that’s really where the learning is, right? If everything’s going well, you’re really probably not getting anywhere to the level of what how you can contribute in, in a sales world. So, I was, you know, I have so many stories, Chris. Let me pick, let me pick one from an example standpoint. So, I had a wonderful leader that was very helpful in being able to demonstrate that you can do your best work, but what you’re doing for me tomorrow is what really matters. So, congratulations on being a top producer, but I’m really interested in where you’re going to take that and how you’re going to continue to contribute at a new and even deeper level going forward. From a sales perspective, I mean you can, you’ve heard the adage of you’re only as good as your next best sell, and I think that’s just true in life of having, being curious and wanting to continuously improve yourself and, and those around you, right? But from a pure sales perspective of sometimes you get it, sometimes you don’t. And when you don’t get it, taking time and having the discipline to understand why you missed out on that opportunity or that award, and then holding yourself to a higher standard, right? I, I believe in the art of possible and setting really high expectations, and then once you reach it, look for another mountain to climb. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, yeah. Um, when you were searching, you’ve mentioned that, you know, you felt really strongly when you took this current role. What were the things that you were looking for when you came into this current role that made you know or convinced you that this is the fit for me? 

Sandy Ellis   
Well, it brought the different components of my career that I have absolutely loved all together into one role and gave me an opportunity to work with a really talented group of executives that also have various experiences that they bring to the table, but we all have the same common mission of wanting to reinvent the service delivery world in the United States as a career, versus something that someone does in between jobs. And we’re able to do that, because as I mentioned earlier, we’re tapping into a much more mature and experienced workforce that chooses to do this work, and that it that is a conscious choice that they are making and they take pride in creating relationships and every connection that they have with their client’s customers. To be a part of that, that and helping set the, the stage to continue to grow the business and scale the business with keeping what makes us special intact was very intriguing to me, and I’m just very humbled and honored to be a part of the team that’s doing that. 

Christopher Smith   
Have you ever gone in for an interview and, and had just red flags? What are those red flags that say this isn’t the right role for me as a sales leader? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah. Yeah, well if you leave with a pit in your stomach, it’s probably, you know, you got to be in tune with yourself, right? I mean it’s not tapping into what excites you or energizes you, right? And I’ll, I’ll share with you that, that, you know, over the course of looking at to what I wanted to do next, I had a couple of conversations where I left thinking, I could do this role or this would be interesting, but it doesn’t just, it doesn’t light me up. You know, and it just it didn’t feel as if that’s what, what, what I was looking for that was aligned with what I knew I could contribute to the marketplace, and so it just wasn’t the right fit and it wasn’t that it was a bad opportunity or a bad customer or a client, it just wasn’t the right one for me, and being able to tap into where I can make the biggest difference. 

Christopher Smith   
What’s your philosophy for building your team and selecting, you know, who you’re going to slot into various positions? 

Sandy Ellis   
So first and foremost, they, it’s a relationship -based business, right? When you’re in service, you need to be able to be authentically connecting with not only your existing client base, but with your prospective clients, with each other, you know from an employee perspective, and passionate about what you’re doing is important, right? I just I think that human nature is we were designed to do work that matters, right? And you really see that with with some of the younger generations being very open and and vocal regarding causes, right, and something that they believe in. And when someone is working in an environment where they are promoting to a cause that they believe in, then you, that’s where the magic happens, right? They’re, they’re energized, they love what they do, and they want to find new and inventive ways, ways to be able to deliver on the expectations of the role. So, you know, that’s, I, first and foremost is the ability to be authentic and open and build relationships as well as, as being able to be vulnerable as you mentioned earlier, and want to learn, be eager to learn. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I think that’s so important. That’s actually one of our core values is learning. I’m just one of those big believers that we can’t be stagnant, we always have to be looking for ways to keep getting stronger or having new challenges, new things we want to learn. I think there’s just tremendous benefits to that. CRM, do you love it, or do you hate it? 

Sandy Ellis   
Oh, CRM. You know, it’s, you know, I think it’s the evil necessity. From a CRO perspective, from a business strategy, you have to be able to capture, analyze, you know, track, and report on data. It’s you’re only as good as the data that’s in your CRM system. So you know there’s, it’s, there’s a multifaceted way of looking at it is that the company needs it, it’s required to be able to the meet and track and really exceed on your strategic goals. You need to be able to have something that your employees are incentive and want to use right, whether that be frictionless, or that they have an opportunity that somehow there’s, there’s something in it for them to actually utilize the tool as it’s designed, right, and it’s going to be designed based on the specifics of that particular company, that in order for them to put valuable information and share the voice of the prospect or the voice of the customer, which is really the, the data that every company is looking at being able to then, you know, strategize with, and it’s got to be easy for them, right? And if it’s, otherwise you’re gonna get junk in there, and it’s going to if anything be a distraction to being able to drive towards your strategy. So, you know, I just if you look at, if you’re capturing the voice of your sales team, your customer, and your prospects, that’s the first start of any good CRM tool, and then having the, the sales process built into that so that you can capture that data, analyze it, and report on it and make some decisions. But it’s, it’s a necessary evil, right, you need that data to be able to make decisions on behalf of your organization. 

Christopher Smith   
Do you guys, I imagine in your business, that handoff between the sales team and the operations seems that now has to execute and deliver the service they were promised is critical in your process. How do you guys manage that in your CRM? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, you lose credibility if you’re not able to do that transition seamlessly, right? And I would say that it’s more outside of the tool, it’s more in the actual sales process itself, that those that are responsible for the execution of operations, right, operational execution are part of the sales process as it gets closer to an award. So, you know, there’s always benefits to that so your, your, your prospect or your new client is getting to know the leaders that will be responsible for executing on behalf of their business before you’re actually awarded that business, right? And so there’s that natural transition or handoff if you will. But ultimately, as I mentioned, this is a relationship business and, and within our network, we will move around things so we can zone on the relationship. So if you’re putting your stamp on something, there’s always going to be that engagement to ensure that your prospect’s needs are being met. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. Do you guys capture or require the sales team to put in specific information or data points that will aid the operations team in that transition? 

Sandy Ellis   
We have, yes, we absolutely do. Right? It’s very important to understand the strategy of the client and the underlying needs as we were talking about earlier of why they’re adding your product or service, right? And so that the entire team is designed to support execution and why they hired us to begin with. So, yes, that, that does flow through, and it’s more from a, they’re part of the early process as I mentioned earlier, but in addition to that, there’s more of kind of briefings if you will, versus going to a tool and looking at that information. That’s always available, but that’s more of a resource, back to we’re a relationship business, so it’s you know communication and setting those expectations early and then capturing them through how we’ve defined our scorecards as an example, are we, are we consistently delivering on behalf of our clients as defined by that particular client engagement. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. Do you guys have a strategy around data analytics in your CRM and, you know, capturing key metrics? Could you talk about that a bit? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yeah, yes. So yes and yes. From an analytic standpoint, it’s really in the service delivery, it can it can take on several different, different perspectives. Our clients are always curious on what their customers are saying. As I was mentioning earlier from a service standpoint, we have the honor of being able to speak to their customer base or prospective customers, and being able to capture that information and then be able to trend it and share that back to our clients is very important. And the more that you can use data analytics to do that, versus the old way of logging in a CRM system or dropdowns that kind of classify it in the right area, but it’s not the true voice of the customer. So that’s very, very key there. And then that really flows through to, as I was mentioning earlier, earlier, voice of your employee base, right? So what are the employees saying that, that you want to capture because they have the opportunity, if a process is broken or something is, is taking away from or a negative impact to the customer experience, what is that why, and they usually have the best recommendations on how to resolve it. Right, so being able to capture that as well. So there’s so many different ways to look at it, but it all comes back to having, having the ability to capture that data, right? And, and hopefully you can do that through technology, but even if you don’t have technology deployed, I would, I would just challenge every organization to track it some way, because that’s, that’s the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, right, your customers are telling you what they need. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s, you’re the first person that’s that said that on the podcast or answered that question that way. And I think that’s incredibly insightful that a lot of people miss out., you know, when you design a process, everyone designs for the ideal scenario, but life is not the ideal scenario. Stuff happens, and you need to be able to capture that information when that does happen because if it keeps happening over and over again, guess what? We need to redesign our process to deal with that. And so that we can handle it seamlessly instead of the frontline staff figuring out, well how do we, I still have to get my work done, what do I need to do to get it out the door and pretty soon you’ve got all these workarounds in place. Yeah, that’s terrific insight for people. We are, unfortunately, at our time here on Sales Lead Dog. Sandy, I really appreciate you coming on the show. If people want to reach out and connect with you personally or if they want to learn more about Activus, what’s the best way for them to do that? 

Sandy Ellis   
Yes, I would love to continue the conversation with anyone who wants to reach out to me directly. [email protected] is my email, and then I’m also active on LinkedIn. So, please reach out. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. We’ll have all that information in the show notes. So, if you liked the episode, please give us a good, you know, a like and, and subscribe and, and we appreciate all the support you guys give us here on Sales Lead Dog. Sandy, thank you so much for coming on the show, it’s been great. 

Sandy Ellis   
Oh, I had fun talking about subjects I’m passionate about, so thank you. I appreciate the opportunity, Chris. 

Outro 
As we end this discussion on Sales Lead Dog, be sure to subscribe to catch all our episodes on social media. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. Watch the videos on YouTube, and you can also find our episodes on our website at Empellorcrm.com/salesleaddog. Sales Lead Dog is supported by Empellor CRM, delivering objectively better CRM for business guaranteed. 

Quotes

  • “We’re primarily domestic in the United States and Puerto Rico, and we’re able to attract and design our support structure on behalf of what the client means based on both geography, as well as skills, and tap into the millions of Americans that want to be able to work from home and have chosen to do that.” (9:38- 10:00)
  • “I learned early in my career to extend grace and accept grace- everything does not go as planned, life is messy, and things happen.” (11:55-12:08)
  • “As a leader, I think it’s important to learn that life is intermingled and being able to figure out how to embrace that and build upon it, versus fighting it will save you a lot of angst.” (26:38-26:54)

Links

Sandy Ellis LinkedIn
Activus Connect LinkedIn
Activus Connect Website

Empellor CRM LinkedIn
Empellor CRM Website