Podcast

Accountability vs Responsibility – Tiffani Misencik

Tiffani Misencik, Intelerad’s Senior Vice President of Sales in North America, is a results-oriented healthcare IT leader with over 20 years of experience. She attributes her hard earned success to 3 things: grit, a collaborative mindset, and her opinion.

In today’s episode, she brings us through her humble beginnings as a sales rep for a soap company all the way to now where she mentors sales industry professionals and the accountability she has learned along the way.

Tiffani leads a team of high-performing sales executives and manages all aspects of business development, forecasting, contracting and driving excellence by supporting her team to both meet and exceed sales goals. Tune in today’s episode to learn the difference between responsibility and accountability.

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Transcript:

Fri, 5/7 12:59PM • 1:06:22 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS 
tiffani, sales, important, understand, people, team, crm, leader, career, sales team, company, thinking, business, cadence, super, solutions, job, role, individual contributor, hospital 

SPEAKERS 
Tiffani Misencik, Christopher Smith 

Intro 
Welcome to the Sales Lead Dog Podcast hosted by CRM technology and sales process expert Christopher Smith, talking with sales leaders that have separated themselves from the rest of the pack. Listen to find out how the best of the best achieve success with their team and CRM technology. And remember, unless you are the lead dog, the view never changes. 

Christopher Smith   
Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. Today we have joining us from outside Philadelphia, Tiffani Misencik. Tiffani, welcome to Sales Lead Dog. 

Tiffani Misencik   
Thank you so much. It’s a pleasure to be here. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I had to throw in the little Philly plug, just because you know I spent quite a bit of my life in that area and, you know, I love Philly, so. Welcome to the show. 

Tiffani Misencik   
Thank you. Thank you. This is a great way to end my day today. 

Christopher Smith   
Awesome, love to hear that. Tiffani, thinking back over your career, what are the three things that have driven or led to your success? 

Tiffani Misencik   
Well, if I really am being honest with myself, I kind of, you know, it’s interesting to reflect back on how you got here. And I think the three things, number one, the very first thing is I’m super gritty, and I don’t know how I didn’t recognize that until later in life. You know, I tell everybody I was exceptionally average growing up, you know, I really, I did everything, I was into everything in school, but I got, you know I was average on the sports teams and average grades and I did well, you know, but I was never the top. And when I looked back, you know, later in life I looked back and I, I continued to succeed despite being kind of what I thought was average. And the real, the real factor was that I always was so determined. It didn’t matter, you know, if I had a B instead of an A, I was determined to go to college, to finish in four years, to get a great job. And that just level of determination far exceeded you know kind of what I would call my probably skill and talent, and, and that continues, probably to be true to this day. So number one for sure is grit, you know, just having that innately, you know, in me to always be thinking about more, you know, and doing more. So, so I think the second thing I would say is that once you get into a great position where you can start being successful, you can’t do that by yourself, you know, without others around you. And I think the other thing, maybe the second thing that has contributed to my success is my real ability to work collaboratively with others, and to really reach into other parts of the organization, build, you know, relationships and a network even internally that really matters, because at the end of the day, when I need to get you know everybody on board around a single strategy to go get a deal or to move the team in one direction, I need other people on board with me. And so that’s a really important trait, and I think I really fine tuned that over the years. It takes, it takes some work to do that, but that’s an investment that’s super worth it. I think the last thing, the third thing, maybe not the last, but is that I always, always have an opinion. You know, and so it’s been important to me and I think it’s helped me in my career, to bring my voice to the table, and not just my voice, but a solution, you know. So never been shy of speaking up, always am thinking about how can we, you know, do better. And I bring that voice to every interaction, without, you know, abandon at all, I mean without any, you know, worry or hesitation, and you know that has served me well. The other half of that is you have to listen when other people do that too. So I think those are the three things, just today. 

Christopher Smith   
Those are, that’s a great answer, and very unique. You’re the first one who said grit, you’re actually I think the first for all three. And we share, we definitely share the last one. Oh boy, do I have opinions. 

Tiffani Misencik   
Right? I mean you got to kind of just, you know, put them out there on the table and then find solutions and see how you get there, so. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s right, that’s right. Tiffani, tell us about your current role in your company.  

Tiffani Misencik   
Sure, I’d love to. It’s exciting, I have, I am the Vice President of Sales for North America for Intelerad. I have been here for three months, roughly. And it is quite a fun ride thus far. So Intelerad is, you know, really a global leader in radiology workflows. We recently acquired two, we’re growing like you know a weed here, and we recently acquired two cardiology and OB you know companies, and that expands our footprint into hospitals and health systems dramatically so that we can now truly provide an enterprise imaging solution to hospitals and health systems. And, you know, I’ve spent my entire career selling to and building relationships with hospitals and health systems, and it’s just super exciting to be a part of this growth at Intelerad, and, you know, to help really execute on this, this true vision and growth plan. It’s, it’s, it’s an amazing time to be here, so. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. And for people that maybe don’t have much healthcare experience, that’s a huge problem you’re solving, correct? 

Tiffani Misencik   
It is. I can give you some personal examples. You know my, I have a very acutely, critically-ill sister, younger sister, and she has been for some time. And if you just think about when, her name is Brittany, when she goes in, and oftentimes she ends up in an ED and she needs immediate care, something’s really wrong. I will tell you that just she spent 10 days in the hospital recently in kidney failure. Think about the moment you, you know she’s, she’s entered into the EDI, and they need to do x-rays and get fast diagnosis, and they take the x-ray or the MRI whatever that, you know picture right is, and they need to quickly get it to the right radiologist, the right doctor who understands the right specialty, etc. in a critical, you know, period of time, seamlessly. That’s what Intelerad does every day. And what does that mean to the patient? It means that they get a faster diagnosis, and it improves their pain, their, their, their experience in the hospital, and ultimately we’re looking for, you know a better outcome right? And, and so I’m so passionate about what I do, what I’ve always done in healthcare, because you know I have a sister who is my why, and it, you know, I, we all have our why’s, but boy, being able to truly make an impact, and understand that impact you know through personal experience, there’s nothing like it, 

Christopher Smith   
I have goosebumps listening to you. That’s amazing. But people, I don’t think people understand you know when you go into a big organization like a hospital just how much technology and that flow of information, how critically important that is to the outcomes. 

Tiffani Misencik   
It really is. And, you know, there are so many points of potential failure. So, you know, what we do is try to be you know the most performant company. We, you know, we have to have solutions that do what they say they’re going to do. Those, you know, you miss a few minutes, and a patient, you know, could die. I mean that, that’s really what we’re talking about here. So it’s, it’s a mission of Intelerad to improve patient lives, period. And I, we do, and we do. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. Thinking back to when you got your start in sales, what do you wish you were taught in that first job? 

Tiffani Misencik   
So much. You know, they, you know, I often say that I’ve really appreciated getting older, because the wisdom comes with it, right? So I don’t mind as the numbers tick up, but if I look back years and years and years ago, I, my first job out of college, it was a sales job and I’m sure we’ll get into that, but I was given, no joke, I was given a company car, a whole bunch of, you know salary and bonus and money, and said, you know at 21 years old, they said, “Just go out and cover Indiana.” And let me tell you what I didn’t know then that I do now: the difference between responsibility and accountability. And it takes a while to get there, so I think, you know, you can be, of course I was responsible in that role. You know, in a role, you have certain responsibilities, right, to do. You know, make X number of sales calls, talk to this many clients, deliver the quota, whatever it is, right? You, you have, we have job descriptions that tell us what our responsibilities are, But nowhere will you find in any sales boot camp or training anywhere what it means to be accountable. And I wish, I wish I could write a book on that, I’m not sure I could, but you know I, I wish someone could have helped me understand that early, probably would have you know saved me some, some pain early on in my career and probably embarrassment, you know, quite frankly. But, you know, accountability is taking true ownership, not being a victim to, you know, again, understanding that you’re truly responsible for whatever outcome you know comes, which is very different than a job task. And so I would try, I you know I certainly would suggest to anyone starting out their sales career, understand that, avoid you know going off a cliff thinking that, you know, you’re checking the box with your job and then, you know, you find out that you didn’t really, you weren’t really performing, you know, and taking ownership. It’s, it’s so important, It’s something that never, it’s the most important thing I could think of today, even till right now, you know is holding, being able to hold yourself accountable. So that’s, that’s what I wish I probably had back then. 

Christopher Smith   
Was there a specific moment, or what was behind you making that connection to accountability? 

Tiffani Misencik   
Well I think it took time, but you know, I’ve had a lot of, you know, ups and downs in my career and if I look at, you know, if I look at them, to be honest with you, even in that early job where I was, and by the way, I was selling soap. My first sales job, I sold soap to grocery stores. I worked for Unilever or Lever Brothers, you’re probably familiar. I mean honestly I was just flying high, I mean I was like whoo, I you know I’ve got a company car, and I was making more money than my friends who you know were poor getting out of college and I thought I was so great. Let me tell you what happened. Um, I bought a house when I was 21 years old, you know, again, really like super responsible right, and then that that same company who put me on this great high, they downsized everything, and they outsourced their entire sales force to, you know like part-timers and it was like they changed their entire structure. And from one day to the next, I found myself, you know, out of a job, didn’t have a car, they had to get that back. You know, I had just bought a house that I couldn’t afford, you know, and I didn’t have any real planning and purpose at that time. I truly was not being accountable for, you know, as an adult, you know and you know and so that was a hard lesson to learn. It was very hard because I kind of lost everything and started over again, and you know I think that really taught me a valuable lesson you know to never be in that situation again. And I need to hold myself accountable for goals, for metrics for, you know, a vision. And moving myself forward, I’m the only one I have to be responsible for that, so it was an important lesson early on. I did recover as you can see. 

Christopher Smith   
You did well, you recovered well. Tell me about your transition to sales leadership, would you say it was an easy transition or was it difficult? 

Tiffani Misencik   
It was easy, um, you know, I don’t remember it being an actual decision to, you know, I don’t remember the day, like there wasn’t a day or a moment or event that I said, “I want to be a sales leader.” But I remember always knowing that I just felt most comfortable and most fulfilled when I was kind of helping others or teaching others so very, very early in my sales career, you know, I would get a best practice, and then share it, like that like for starters on my sales team. And I, I just really started to emerge always in every sales team as kind of the person, the go-to. And I, I knew at some point that I was deriving a great sense of pride from that, which made it very natural, right, for me to go, “Oh of course I’m gonna move into sales leadership.” It for me, you know there are there are people that are highly motivated, there are sales people that are highly motivated, we’re all motivated by very different things. And early on, most of us are you know in our career are motivated by money. And there, there would just was a point right in my career where there was a tipping of the scale, where I had done all that, I was very successful. But, um, that, my motivation shift, shifted. And so, you know when a, the kind of the middle manager, an AVP role, I remember at Allscripts, which is where I was at the time, opened up. I mean I was like, “Of course I’m going to do this.” Um, that, that does come with some challenges, you know that transition, and certainly I have lots of lessons learned, and maybe, you know, could share those as well, about becoming a first time leader.  

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. 

Tiffani Misencik   
It was, I had another pivotal moment later in my career, you know, and it really, when you become a first time leader, what, there’s a natural income inclination to continue doing the things you did before, right, which is individual contribution right, so. So, as an individual contributor, you’re in control, right, of your destiny to some extent, let’s say mildly in control. And you know that was a lesson learned early on as an AVP is that I found myself. I’ll tell you a story my, my first ADP role at Allscripts, I, you know, blew the numbers out, you know, with my team it was we were highly successful, number one team that year, quarter after quarter. I was having a lot of fun, right, that sounds awesome, doesn’t it?  

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, it does. 

Tiffani Misencik   
And I sat down and had a performance review with my boss, right, at the time. And he said, you know, “Tiffani, this is all great, but there was a but.” And I you know for me I was like “What, there’s a but? What do you mean, this is all great, right?” He said, “But if you want to grow as a leader, you have to figure out how to make other little Tiffani’s. This is not scalable.” And I, you know, I remember initially being offended and not understanding I totally was like, shut to shut off to that concept. And I absolutely understand at this point you know what my boss at the time was talking about. If you find yourself, I mean it’s hard to give up, right, that control, and you have to make a pivot from caring more about yourself to care and your own performance to caring more about your team’s performance. And that, you have to make that pivot to scale to scale your team and to succeed, truthfully, so I learned that lesson about like two years in, and, you know, I think there are doers, and there are leaders. And if you’re a leader, and you find yourself doing, then who’s leading.?  

Christopher Smith   
Right.  

Tiffani Misencik   
You know, and so my advice right to a new leader is to just get your you know, understand that it’s not about you. You have to make the pivot and start being a mentor, a coach, you know, and you have to figure out how to get the team to do, right, to rise up and to do. And that was, again, that was a little hard lesson to learn from my boss, but he was right. He was right. 

Christopher Smith   
Don’t you hate when they’re right? That’s great. That is really great. You took about three of the questions I normally ask and you put them all in one great answer. I love that. 

Tiffani Misencik   
I’m very efficient. 

Christopher Smith   
You are. Super efficient. 

Tiffani Misencik   
I have a red personality, so. 

Christopher Smith   
So when it comes to being a sales leader, and you talked a little bit about this, I think part I think of being a great sales leader is you want to identify other potential great sales leaders. What’s your strategy for cultivating those people within your team? 

Tiffani Misencik   
So I mean, it all starts with. I am a firm believer that you should always constantly be thinking about who could take your own job. Like I want somebody to take my job, always, you know. And I think if, if you’re in that mindset, then that’s the right one to be a really great leader, versus, right, being competitive with your own team, I mean, I want to grow people. That’s, that’s what a good leader should should be focused on. And so having said that, I do believe that you should constantly be assessing talent on your team, you know, I don’t think a team is ever set and final, and you know because the market changes, we make acquisition, acquisitions, the solutions change, whatever it is, you should be constantly assessing. And there are things that I assess, just for quality you know qualities that I look for, for a great, great, you know, rep team, but all of those same qualities would be the same, right, things that I look for in a great leader or  successor or you know, whomever it is. And I think, first of all, I believe firmly that it’s, it’s easier to teach skill versus talent. You know, so I do look for, you know, past success, and how, how that success was derived, you know through, I very specifically look for great critical thinking skills and problem solving skills. I look, you know I mentioned before that I think one of the things that has helped me so much is being able to reach across aisles and collaborate, right, to get everyone on the same page to move a strategy forward, super important in a sales rep. I do for sure look for more of a team-oriented person versus an I, like me. And that doesn’t say that, you know, I mean look, there are many many jobs that require, you know, hunters out there just, right? We got to have that, but at the end, at the end of the day, I don’t believe that any deal is done alone. Ever. So I look for that. And those are all the same qualities, that the qualities are the same. The performance then, that’s a different thing, the execution, right? So for a great leader, I would look for all those qualities and what did they do with them. Were they able to take all those qualities, put them together, and are they moving the ball forward, you know, with the team, can I see those, you know, just like I used to kind of rise up in my team and help with best practices and, you know, volunteer for extra things, I look for those people who are naturally waiting, you know, without the title, and it happens all the time, there’s always a leader, even, even at the individual contributor level, you know. 

Christopher Smith   
When you stepped into your current role, can you talk a bit about your strategy? I know that’s a big, you know it can be difficult for a lot of people when you’re stepping into a new company, new team, you know. What’s your strategy for your first 90 days? 

Tiffani Misencik   
Well this was my first ninety. You literally hit me on my first 90 days. So, for those Inteleradors who are listening, now you’re going to, like, we’re going under the covers. Now you’re going to figure out what I was doing over the last 90 days. So for me, the, the very, very first thing I’d say is, and I did this, I think anyone again anyone from Intelerad who has been listening, they will confirm, I’m sure. So it’s very important to set the tone with the team. So, number one, I believe in a very rigorous cadence for communication. And I don’t vary from that. So, and that’s one-on-one and team. So I, right away, I come in and I set the cadence for how we’re going to work together and communicate, and some of that’s formal and a lot of it’s informal, but, but that’s very important, right to establish that first. The second thing is to through that cadence that you’ve just laid out, establish very clear expectations. And, you know, I’m new, people are different, everyone leads in a different way, but I find that transparency and setting expectations is the best way, you know, to, to mitigate surprises. You know, everyone should, everybody on the team should understand what is expected and why, why it’s important to, to them, to me, to the business. So I do a lot of just expectation setting, but it’s, it’s all rooted in the why, why, why, why is this important. And then the third thing is assess talent, assess talent, assess talent. And, and provide feedback, assess, feedback, assess, feedback. And you know, I built some great relationships in 90 days with the team, who, you know, arguably, wasn’t so sure about this you know girl coming in, you know, out of nowhere. So it’s really important to build, build the framework for for communication and use it quickly to get to know people and, and then start assessing skill set. And the worst thing you would want is to have people in the wrong roles, you know for long term. 

Christopher Smith   
To create that, that aggressive communication, I think a big part of that is establishing trust where people have to trust you to receive that communication, especially if it’s bad news or it’s not news you may want to hear. How do you go about establishing that trust? 

Tiffani Misencik   
Sure. It’s funny you use the word news. So I have an, I had this in Allscript too and through my career, I have just my mantra, I guess. And, and it stays with me wherever I go and I pass it on to my new team here. The news is the news. It’s what we do with it that matters. And so, under, you know, that kind of guidance, it’s kind of like I need to know, I can’t help you if I don’t know the news. Now, it can be great news. And we can celebrate, and it can also be really, really bad news. And that’s okay, because it’s not so much the news that I care about. It’s knowing what our plan is to mitigate it or do something you know what are we going to do about it. And so that’s really, you know, that’s how the team is run here, you know, that’s how the organization is. And so immediately, I kind of laid that as the, the framework, but I also want to share something else. I, personally, I do have clear and some would say high expectations. I have a rigorous cadence, you know, I had a forecast call today and the team, I got feedback from them and said, “Wow, well you really mean business.” You know you had it shaken up, I get. So Tiffani is all about business. However, I’m super open and vulnerable as well. And so my team knows a lot about me, about my personal life, I share. You know I certainly keep boundaries but I do think, you know, I’m a person. You know, they’ve seen me cry, they know about my sister, they know about it you know I, those, that matters. I’m just a person and they’re people, too, and we’re all trying to do what’s best and, ultimately, we all have the same goal, right, which is help patients and help this company succeed greatly and make money. And I think the best way for me is to really, I’m always balanced between business and vulnerability. And that allows other people to be vulnerable, too. 

Christopher Smith   
I’m kind of speechless here listening, like the, you hit it with the word vulnerability I think. That is, you can’t have trust without being vulnerable. And, you know, if you’re always gonna have these shields up, you’re never gonna get to that level of trust. That, that’s awesome. Yeah, that, wow. 

Tiffani Misencik   
I make mistakes. I don’t know everything. I’m new to this company, there are, there are many on my team that they know way more than I do right now, you know, so, I, I’m always, I’m kind of asking them to hey, just trust that I know how to at least get, lead us. I don’t know all the things all the time, you know, and it’s, that’s just where you know I think it’s really important to have that, to build that first of all, but you only get that through honesty and vulnerability. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh, you bet. That’s how you create a team that’s willing to run through a wall, you know, with you, not for you but with you. Let’s transition a bit to talk about one of my favorite topics, CRM.  

Tiffani Misencik   
Oh boy. 

Christopher Smith   
Do you love or do you hate it? 

Tiffani Misencik   
So, wow, double-edged sword there. It is the love-hate relationship, I will tell you that. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh it can be. Yeah. 

Tiffani Misencik   
I’m gonna tell you why I hate it, and then I’ll tell you why I love it. How about that? So, I hate it, I mean I just, you know, I hate all the things about the, you know, entering the data and just the process that you know, the time that’s involved in all the things. And, and I actually am speaking on behalf of the team, mostly because I’m not in there, I’m not even the one in there building the quotes and, you know, forecasting and you know I get the output of it. And I can see the pain that it causes, and that’s no different here than anywhere else, you know. However, you know, we talked about earlier making sure that everyone understands the why, why do we do these things, you know, why, why are you making me you know check the box on Salesforce. And when you do understand the why, it becomes a little bit more of a love relationship. And so, you know, we just went through a really major transformation of our business systems at Intelerad and we upgraded everything new instance of Salesforce, new processes, I mean soup to nuts, really cool. A lot of pain to get there, but at the end of the day, the reason I love that and I love CRM is because I’m gonna have the data that I need to manage the business. And that’s it, I mean it. I don’t know how else you could manage and run a very successful business and be proactive and think ahead and do planning without the data that’s so valuable within the CRM. So there’s my love hate relationship. 

Christopher Smith   
No I love it. Why do you think so many companies, or salespeople, I’m gonna narrow the focus here, salespeople when, when you ask them, “Hey, what do you think about CRM?” more times than often you’ll hear CRM sucks? Why is that from a salesperson’s perspective do you think? 

Tiffani Misencik   
You know I think that they’re so wired to be just out in the field, customer-focused, sell, sell, sell, sell, sell, that this, it really does just feel like a administrative task that is not, it you know the I don’t think they’re connecting the dots to how this helps me make my money. You know, so I suppose if we could, if we could connect those dots that might be a little less painful. It is, it is likely the bane of everyone’s existence in sales. But there is value, especially when you’re being, you know, you’re measured on performance, you’re measured on your pipeline and, you know, those are the types of things that I try to focus on with, you know, the sales team. And it’s good, you know, when their business is growing and you can see it, you know, in the CRM, then that’s a great thing. So, I think everyone out you know salespeople are wired to just be out and about, which, which has, which has been really, really a struggle with COVID. I can assure you. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh yeah, yeah, you know it’s funny, you kept saying you have to have your why. I talk about this a lot in the podcasts and with clients we work with that when, whenever you’re talking to users of CRM or really any system, you have to give them a reason of why their work and their interactions with the system is so important. And, and I think you said it that a lot of people they just think well this is the sucks for me, but they don’t understand that the data they’re putting in CRM or you’re putting in CRM, we’re using that to forecast. We’re going to hire off of this, we’re going to make purchase decisions off of this, we’re, there’s a whole decision tree behind the data and CRM. And if the data sucks, all those other decisions downstream are going to suck, too. 

Tiffani Misencik   
That’s right, that’s right. 

Christopher Smith   
So yeah, I think it’s really important to, you know, expand those blinders or take them off and get people that really understand that it’s not just about them. There’s a whole bunch of people relying on the work that you’re doing in that CRM, but it also at the same time it’s got to help them. And so when you guys were going through this big reconfiguration of your CRM, were there certain things that you guys were doing your strategies to make it easier or better for your sales team? 

Tiffani Misencik   
Of course, and, and I would say, I mean the end result, you know, of this transformation, it will be, it is incredible when you think about you know contracted cash and, and, and how, now we have a workflow, you know soup to nuts, right, through that process that quite honestly, if working right then, it helps the sales rep, right? It helps so many people who previously were, you know, fighting those fires and escalations or manual processes, etc. So there’s a lot of value in it, and you know we’re thrilled that we it was a major milestone for our company. Just recently, too, so. So the one thing I would say, you know, that would be key is, you know for for others, right, who are going through a similar transformation, specifically on their CRM is just, just do make sure that sales rep that voice of sales and, more importantly, the voice of the client is at the table when you’re, when you’re planning and designing and building. The one thing that you have to make sure you can accomplish at the end of all this transformation is that does the system support the way that we have to sell and the way a client buys? You know, it’s no good if we just put a bunch of, you know processes in place, and then they don’t map to, you know, our entire sales strategy. So it is, it has been an interesting learning process, even here, to, to recognize the connection between those things. Yes, it’s super important. 

Christopher Smith   
That last part, you said gets left out of the equation, a lot, we’re so focused on how we sell, we don’t think about how does the customer want to buy from us? And are we making it easy for them to buy from us or are we putting in, you know, unintentional roadblocks or obstacles that are making it harder or slower to buy from us? That’s awesome. Well we are at our end time here on Sales Lead Dog. Tiffani, it has been great listening to you. I really appreciate you coming on the show and sharing your insights. If people want to reach out and connect with you and to just connect with you, or to learn more about Intelerad, what’s the best way for them to do that? 

Tiffani Misencik   
Oh sure, I would love that. The more the merrier, right, I love new connections. So they can find me on LinkedIn, or [email protected] would do it too. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. Yeah, and all that will be in the show notes. So again, thank you so much for coming on Sales Lead Dog, it’s been great. 

Tiffani Misencik   
It’s been my pleasure. Thanks so much. 

Outro 
As we end this discussion on Sales Lead Dog, be sure to subscribe to catch all our episodes on social media. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. Watch the videos on YouTube, and you can also find our episodes on our website at Empellorcrm.com/salesleaddog. Sales Lead Dog is supported by Empellor CRM, delivering objectively better CRM for business guaranteed. 

Quotes

  • “And let me tell you what I didn’t know then that I do now the difference between responsibility and accountability. And it takes a while to get there.” (17:25-17:34)
  • “You know, they, you know, I often say that I’ve really appreciated getting older, because the wisdom comes with it, right? So I don’t mind as the numbers tick out.” (16:47-16:55)
  • “You have to make a pivot from caring more about yourself to care and your own performance to caring more about your team’s performance.” (25:58-26:08)
  • “I think one of the things that has helped me so much is being able to reach across aisles and collaborate right to get everyone on the same page to move a strategy forward. Super important in a sales rep.” (29:42-29:54)

Links

Tiffani Misencik: LinkedIn
Intelerad Medical Systems: LinkedIn
Intelerad Medical Systems Website

Empellor CRM LinkedIn
Empellor CRM Website