Podcast

The Three P’s: People, Process and Profit – Wesleyne Greer

Chemist turned sales coach, Wesleyne Greer has a clear idea of what contributed to her sales success: people, process, and profit… and in that order. Wesleyne explains that her work in a lab just wasn’t getting her the face-to-face interaction she craved. She turned to sales as a profession because it fulfilled her constant curiosity and played to her listening skills and problem-solving strengths. Once she entered a sales role, Wesleyne quickly realized that this profession was the job she had always dreamed of.

Wesleyne’s passion and drive resulted in a rapid ascent from individual contributor to international sales manager. However, when she reached this new stage on the sales ladder, she was surprised by a striking deficit in available resources. While she had received plenty of guidance in her entry role, there just weren’t the same support systems in place at the managerial level. This experience inspired Weslyne to start her own business that focuses on helping sales managers transform into empowered leaders, who can effectively guide their teams to consistent success.

Tune into this week’s episode of Sales Lead Dog to learn more about Wesleyne’s perspective on how sales managers can establish a balance between authority and individualized support for each and every team member. How should a sales manager approach top performers? How do you balance pressure from your boss with adding lasting value to your sales team? What integral role does your CRM play in your team’s success? Wesleyne and host Chris Smith will explore these questions in-depth during this week’s episode, “The Three P’s: People, Process, and Profit.”

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Transcript:

Fri, 3/5 3:13PM • 48:05 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS 
sales, people, sales manager, salespeople, crm, kpis, leader, top performers, kpi, deal, person, quota, organization, objective measure, hitting, tool, opportunity, converting, success, effort 

SPEAKERS 
Wesleyne Greer, Christopher Smith 

Intro 
Welcome to the Sales Lead Dog Podcast hosted by CRM technology and sales process expert Christopher Smith, talking with sales leaders that have separated themselves from the rest of the pack. Listen to find out how the best of the best achieve success with their team and CRM technology. And remember, unless you are the lead dog, the view never changes. 

 Christopher Smith   
Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. Today we have a guest I’m very excited to have on the show, Wesleyne Greer of Transformed Sales. Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. 

 Wesleyne Greer   
Thanks so much for having me. I’m excited to be here. 

 Christopher Smith   
It’s great to have you on. Wesleyne, when I start the show with my sales leaders that I have on, I always ask the question what are the three things that have really contributed to their success. With the type of work that you do with sales leaders, in your opinion, what are the things that make a sales leader successful? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
Hmm. So, I say it’s all about the three P’s and it’s people, process, and profit. And I put profit at the end and people at the beginning, because essentially without the right people in place, you’re not going to be profitable and building a process without having the right people in place, you won’t ensure that you have profit. So, again, get the right people in place, ensure that they have a good process to follow so that you can be profitable as a leader. 

 Christopher Smith   
I love that. That’s easy to remember, too. 

 Wesleyne Greer   
Easy to remember the three P’s. And my clients are always like the three P’s Wesleyne I’m focused on, and when they send me emails, it’s actually like this one is about people. This one is about process. This one is about profit because, and everything that we do we keep it in those three buckets, which, if it doesn’t fit in those three buckets, then why are you even focusing on it, right? Because so many times as sales leaders, there’s so many things that pull us from all these different directions, and if we’re not focused, then everything falls apart. 

 Christopher Smith   
That’s right. I love that. How’d you get your start in sales? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So I am actually a chemist by trade. And when I was a chemist working in the lab, I realized that I wanted some more people interaction, right, like it was just me in a bubble and what I did was failure analysis at a plastics company. So I would get like a big igloo cooler that cracked and figure out what happened. And so I want to know more about okay, why did this actually happen, it wasn’t meant to crack, and I entered into the sales role because I was always so curious. And I tell people when I got into sales, I finally figured out what I wanted to be when I grew up. And I love everything about sales. I loved everything about it, and because of my love and my passion and desire, I made a fast ascent from individual contributor to international sales manager. And one thing that I realized as the international sales manager was when I was a new sales rep, there were tons of resources. I mean, every book, every webinar or training, but when I was a new sales manager and figuring out how to hire people that were profitable and giving you a process right, it was just like all on me. So a few years ago, I started my business, and I really focused on helping sales managers develop into leaders, because a lot of times it’s managers who are so tactical, you’re not strategic, and really developing into that leader is where my passion lies.  

 Christopher Smith   
I love that. It’s interesting when I talk to people and ask them about their journey, that the the people that come from the scientific or engineering backgrounds. When they switch into sales, I know it’s not always, they’re not always successful but it, the experiences I have with the people that I know personally, they all seem to be incredibly successful as salespeople. What do you think is, what is it about the scientific mind and being successful at sales? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
I you know, I always it’s always in two camps, because if you’re a scientist or engineer or somebody in that very technical field and you have that desire to do a little something more, that means that you’re not necessarily, you’re not really an introvert and you’re not an extrovert, right. So you kind of toe on that little line between introverted and extroverted. And one of the best characteristics in salespeople is the ability to listen. And so a scientist and engineers were taught to listen, like you just set up and listen, what are the problems that are happening and then after you listen, you have to figure out the why, the what behind it. And so when you think about people from those very technical backgrounds, that’s the reason I think that they become good salespeople, because of their ability to listen and dissect the problem into the smallest minute details. 

 Christopher Smith   
That’s a great, I love that. That’s the best answer I’ve ever gotten on that, that makes perfect sense. Let’s talk about people, because I as a sales leader that, I love that, you that’s your number one, because I think that should be the number one for every sales leader. If I’m a sales leader, and I need to build a team, what is, what is my priority around people? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
I would, let me start with what you don’t do. So what you don’t do is hire industry insiders. Don’t get your competitors rejects, like, do not do that, because if they were let go from their competitor or if they’re willing to leave a competitor for a salary and just the same, or, like, the base salary excites them, that means they’re not producing anything, right, so those are leading indicators. And I always, always tell sales managers, sales leaders, it’s about solid sales skills. All of those things about you can teach them your products, your services, you teach them the technology, but what you can’t teach somebody is really solid sales skills. So look for someone who has those skills. If you’re selling a complex, technical piece of equipment, you may say no, I would never hire somebody who sold insurance, but why not, because people who sell insurance are 100% commission-based, and if they can prove to you that they made six figures selling insurance, that’s what you want, because they’re hungry. Right. And, again, you can teach them the product. 
 Christopher Smith   
Right. What if I’m a sales leader coming into a new organization, what are those first things I need to do focused on people? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So the first thing that you need to do, it’s almost like you know when you are a teacher, and they tell you you have to establish your authority or the kids are going to run over you. It’s the same thing with a brand new sales manager, right. If you don’t establish yourself as the authoritative figure, the person who takes, you know, you don’t take anything right. And there’s always that balance of having empathy and just being a pushover. And a lot of times, it happens when a salesperson is promoted up through the ranks and their buddies become their employees, and so they don’t know how to say no or push them a little bit harder. So when you’re a new sales manager in that environment, it’s really really important for people to focus on okay, I need to establish authority and take it a step further, you need to set up individual meetings with every sales person on your team, get to know them, get to know them as a person, get to know what drives them, like what are their personal goals, right, they have a bonus and commission structure, but maybe they’re trying to buy a new house, so you know that hey, when I’m in a meeting with them, and we’re caught, we’re going through pipeline review, you say hey, that’s great, you close that deal, you’re $2,000 closer to your down payment. Right. And so really getting in there, establishing yourself as an authority, and then taking it a step further and really really working with people one-on-one is key. 

 Christopher Smith   
How does the new sales leader assess a team or what’s the proper way for them coming in when they’re meeting with them and doing a one-on-ones, what are the things they should be looking for? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So there there are tools, and there are tools that we use within my organization, and these tools are really a very objective measure of finding a sales leader, right, they’re an objective measure of a sales leader understanding what the team needs, and it can, it has like 21 distinct characteristics. One of them is sales technology, CRM, social selling. Another one is their ability to listen, right. And so using an objective tool like that, if you go into the organization with something like that, it puts you a step further because you know exactly what to coach those people on, you’re not waiting for three months and seeing that this person isn’t producing and figuring out, oh okay, so they don’t like the prospect, right, but in our business, if we don’t prospect, we don’t get anything. And then after you use that very, very subjective, I’m sorry the very objective measure, you should have a little checklist right, and I did this with a client recently. It’s a little chart, right, you have effort on one side and you have quota on the other side. You make four boxes and you plot everybody in there. Right. Literally, the people who are giving a lot of effort and are at the low quota. Those are the ones you work with first, those are the ones you work with more closely, because if they’re putting a lot of effort in and they’re not hitting quota, they just need some small tweaks, like, let’s fix this or let’s do that. Right. The ones who are low quota and low effort, you have to decide, as a sales manager, is it worth your time, because if they’re not trying and they’re not hitting their quota, should you try? And sometimes you know you have you tried a little bit, but how long, right? I’ll give it 60 days or 90 days, but I’m not going to give it six months, because, again, low effort, low quota. 

 Christopher Smith   
What about the top performers? What do I do as a sales manager with my top people? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So with the top performers, I always say, you know a lot of organizations they have these KPIs or this or that. I call it foolishness, because I’m not a KPI pusher. And you want those top performers to do that, just to check a box. And again, if they’re in that top quadrant of high effort and high quota, leave them alone, but there’s going to be one or two things that you can work on with them, because if that top performer is at 100% of quota every month, what do we need to do to get them to 105 or to 110. Right? And so it’s just going to be a small tweak, and that small tweak or the small area that you can coach them on, because they’re a high performer, they’re going to do it, they’re going to take it and you might want them to get 5%, but they might get 10% or 20% Right? 

 Christopher Smith   
Right. So, as a sales leader, and I’ve got my top performers, they’re crushing it, what are some techniques I can use to transfer their success to that middle tier that’s trying to become a top performer? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
That’s the second p! Process! That’s the process, you hit the nail on the head. You build your sales process not based on what the corporate office wants it to be or what your boss wants it to be, you base your sales process off what’s working in the field. And the way you figure out what’s working in the field is you talk to the top performers, right, you say okay, so what do you do when a lead comes in, then what do you do, how long do you wait? Like literally build the sales process based on those top performers, and then you beta test it with the middle of the pack people to see if they’re able to kind of step up, and then once it’s refined, you roll it out to the low performers, right. And that’s actually the way you build the sales process, not based on what you want them to do or your boss wants them to do or a corporate office wants them to do. 

 Christopher Smith   
Right, or those KPIs or things like you know that you might want to the management team might want to see, but, you know, how do you balance that as a sales leader where you’re getting that pressure like hey, we want to see these numbers, but it really isn’t adding value to the sales team, how do you manage that? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So KPIs typically come about when your team is not performing. If your team is performing well, your manager is going to leave you alone, because they know you know what you’re doing. So when those KPIs come down, I don’t encourage managers to buck the system, but I always take the KPI a step further. So sometimes they’ll have a KPI of number of phone calls you make in a day. I don’t care how many phone calls you make, I want to know how many phone calls converted. So, the corporate says make phone calls, my KPI to the team is how many of those calls converted, because the more conversions we get along the process, the less they’re going to be on my back, right, because your, your team is reflective of you. So again, take the KPIs, do it, but focus on the conversion. 

 Christopher Smith   
Right. A big part of you think of KPIs, is people pick a lot of times the wrong KPIs. How do you massage things, or do you have any recommendations for people on how they can help guide what KPIs they should be using? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So again, for me a KPI is all about a conversion. So when I think about how many incoming leads are converting to discovery calls, how many discovery calls are converting to demos, how many demos are converting to proposals like. So think about not the action, but what is the outcome of the action, because the outcome tells you anybody can call 20 people in a day. Anybody can do that. But only the good salespeople can convert five of those 20 people, right, and the low performers are going to make their 20 calls, and that’s it. There’s gonna be nothing, right, there’s gonna be no convergence. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yep, I was reading “Hyper Sales Growth” by Jack Daly, and he was talking about that where he was working with a company and, and they were all about like hey, we need you know our call numbers, the number of calls a day, that metric has gone in the floor, you’re killing us, blah blah blah. And he’s like, but, but your sales numbers have gone through the roof. You know, because we’re focusing on the right calls, not just you know if I can make your call number goes sky high, you’re not gonna have any money. Cause you’re investing in the wrong thing. 

 Wesleyne Greer   
And you know the top sales people, when they get those ridiculous KPIs, they just do it, check the box, and keep going. And what happens is the sales, and I picked this above a sales manager, because the sales manager, they’re in tune with their people, so usually if there’s something, it’s coming above their level so maybe the VP of Sales and CEO or whoever that upper crest is, and they’re like, wow look at this person, they’re making that 20 calls and they’re hitting their number. No, it’s not, it’s because they’re smart. They don’t want you on their back, so they do what they have to do and then they just keep rolling. Right. So even thinking about comparing one person to another, because some people may not be as good at converting the lead to the discovery call, but they may be really good at that discovery call to that demo. So they really don’t need to have as many leads, whereas other people, if they’re not as strong at the end, they need more the top of the funnel. So when companies put this one-dimensional, you know, view of success into the whole sales team, it just, it hurts the organization more than it helps it. 

 Christopher Smith   
I always ask this, or I like to ask this question when I interview sales leaders, is you know beyond just the revenue number, what’s your definition of success? What is your recommendation for sales leader what their definition of success should be? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So, again, going back to my effort and quota, sir. Right. So when I think about success, it when I ask a sales leader who is your top salesperson or who are your top salespeople they always give me the one who’s hitting quota, but to me it’s more about consistency. Sometimes people can have a really great year, and then they could be duds for the next two years. So, a definition of success is consistency. Right. So if you have somebody who is consistently at 90% of quota every single month, your goal needs to be to bump them up, they’re a good salesperson because they’re consistent. Right. And it’s the small tweaks that I talked about in thinking about that individual, what can I do to elevate them more. And the person who when you say, “Hey, we have this new initiative, we have this new tool that’s going to help you do your job better,” they say, “Okay, I’m open to trying it. Maybe it won’t work out, but at least I’ll try it.” Right, so they’re willing to try new things to help their business grow. 

 Christopher Smith   
I’m huge on process. I very passionate about it when it comes to sales as well as just traditional operational processes with an organization. What’s your advice for someone that, you know, that maybe they’re coming into a new organization and process isn’t what it should be, what should they focus on first to get process under control? 

Wesleyne Greer   
So I know this is probably going to be music to your ears, but I love the CRM. So, I tell people, like, that’s where you, we start the conversation. I’m working with a new company right now and I looked in the CRM, I’m like what’d do you guys do all week? There’s nothing in here. Like, it’s not, and I tell people, if it’s not in the CRM, it didn’t happen. And there’s no way for you to have a healthy pipeline of, I don’t care what your business is, but a healthy pipeline should be 50 to 500 deals, right. How can you remember all of the details of every single deal, right, if it’s not in there. So I say start in the CRM. And when you’re in the CRM, you’re gonna see the people who have good CRM integrity, right, so you’ll go and see every single call they made, you’ll see notes, you’ll see proposals, demos, you’ll see that, and usually that’s a pretty dotted line to the ones who are more successful. Sometimes there are the outliers who are able to juggle all those things and they’re, they’re more of the, I call the you know the wild, wild west kind of sales people, like they’ve always done it that way, they’ve never put anything in electronic, but again, usually the people who have the best kept CRM are your better salespeople. So you can take that and then look at the ones who are not using the CRM right, and those are going to be your, your lower performers. And I say I like to tell, so a KPI that I get from my clients is to do a literally a daily spot check of the CRM. So just pick any opportunity, any salesperson, and see what they put in there, right. And if you go in there and they’ve done something good, you send them a note straightaway. “Hey Bob, I just looked at this opportunity. You did a really good job of qualifying them, keep up the good work.” Right? And if they are not doing good, you send them a note, “Hey I just looked at this opportunity and it’s said it’s been sitting in this one stage for 375 days, what’s going on here?” Right, so you have to really enforce the these tools because this is how we build our process. That’s how the whole process starts with you digging in to see what is actually happening.  

 Christopher Smith   
Right. How can sales managers or sales leaders leverage CRM as a learning tool? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
Yes. How can we make it a learning tool? So, the way that you can use your CRM as a learning tool is, I like to say that anyone from the CEO down to the person who is taking out the trash, to be able to pull an opportunity out, and they should be able to know by looking in the CRM, who the customer is, what their problem is, how we’re solving their problems, the right products, everything, right, like they should be able to know exactly everything about that opportunity or that deal by looking in the CRM. So the way that you use that to teach is, again, in your team meetings, you pull up this opportunity that you saw, and you say, “Hey, do you see this opportunity? It took six months to close, but look how many activities were in here. Look how many touch points, and not just random phone calls, a call to check in, it’s a phone call, it’s a personalized note that was sent out. It’s, we went and had lunch, we went and played golf,” right so you model the things that those reps are doing, and again it doesn’t even need to be something where you’re putting, you’re elevating something. It’s just letting, let me show you how to use it the right way and how it can help your business, because for salespeople, I tell them this is your small business. You put into it what you get out and what you’ll get out. So garbage in, garbage out. If you want to make money, because salespeople make money the more they do, you need to do the things. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yep. I love that. What about, rejection’s a huge part of sales. Tracking, you know, the last deals in CRM I think is is a very important aspect of the sales process. What are your thoughts around that? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
Now this pet peeve I have around loss of deals is we lost on price. And like I like you should never lose on price because you, that means, so when I see loss on price, what I tell the salesperson is no you failed as a salesperson, like, you must take ownership for this, because a lot of times, they don’t want to take ownership. And so for, and again it depends on what the sales cycle is, right. But for those deals that have a very long sales cycle, I always recommend you have to do a post mortem. So again, if you have good CRM integrity and you’ve done what you should do, you should the sales manager should sit down with the salesperson and literally rip the deal apart. What did you miss? What went wrong? What did you not hear? If at the end they said, you don’t have this feature, so we went with your competitor, you missed something in your qualification. You didn’t uncover the need that they had for this thing, or this item, or you max added 10 licenses and we need 500, right. So really, at the end of the day, you have to do a post mortem, because it’s okay to lose a deal, but it’s not okay to lose a deal the same way twice. 

 Christopher Smith   
Love it, love it. And again, if that data is not in CRM, you’re not going to have a very good post-mortem. 

 Wesleyne Greer   
No you’re not, if it just is. It opened. You sent a proposal, it closed, locked on price. Again, a teaching tool. So you teach the same way to show this is why you lost it, like, what do you know about this deal? What was the problem that they were having? What was the impact of their organization? 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah. Yep. How do you motivate a team when it comes to, you touched on this a little bit, but, there always are, I shouldn’t say always are, but occasionally you get people that just, they don’t see the value in CRM or are they just don’t want to participate. What are some strategies you recommend for getting that buy-in and getting those people to engage with the platform? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
So, you know, when people, so again, and this is very, a very non-traditional view. For that person that is putting the effort in, they’re hitting quota. So when I say putting effort in there, if they’re a sales rep, they’re traveling a lot, so I’m seeing them out on the road, I’m getting expensive receipts from them. They’re closing deals, they’re at 100% or closer to a quota, then those people, I mean I kinda I ease them into it right, I don’t want to force them to do something, because honestly, I don’t need to rock the boat. It’s the people who aren’t hitting quota, and who aren’t putting in the effort, right. So, the way that I really motivate them to use it is at the end of the day sales people are in sales, because they want to make money, right, commission, bonus. You want to make money, and if you’re not hitting quota, you’re not making money. So the way I model, because a lot of times in CRM you have like a sandbox version, right. So, in the sandbox version, I’ll typically have good, good deals, bad deals, right. Ones that were won, ones that were lost. And I’ll show them why, right, and then I ask that simple question, “If you have 50, 50 opportunities active today, how can you remember everything that happens?” and they say, “It’s all in my head.” “Okay, let’s go through your pipeline,” and then ask them about every single one as to who the decision maker is, what what are their needs, what’s the problem here, what’s their budget here, and then they won’t have the answer, and then you just make them do it. That’s when I Institute KPIs. That’s when I’m like, you must do this. If you do not do this, we are going to have problems. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yep, yep, yep, and another part of that too is even the top salespeople hit down periods, they hit tough times, everybody does. And but if you cannot tracking things in CRM, how are you as a leader going to be able to engage and really help them maybe tweak those things, as you’re saying, making those small adjustments that maybe get them out of the slump? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
And you know, the thing is, when those top sales people have slow periods, they rebound quickly because they go back to a customer that they had, they closed a year or two ago, and they’d be like, “Oh hey we have this new product,” or “We have this new add-on,” right. So they, their slump isn’t as low, because they have all the information. Oh, Kathy had a baby. Maybe I should send something for the one year birthday, right. Oh, this person just got married, oh they like golf, maybe I’ll, let’s go golfing.Because all of that stuff should be in the CRM. It’s literally the database of everything about the opportunity, the people, the company, everything. 

 Christopher Smith   
What made you decide you wanted to be a coach and do what you’re doing? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
I just absolutely love to help people get that aha moment, right. I really intimately remember when that was me I was struggling like, I can’t get, I can’t motivate my people, I can’t hire people, like what am I doing? Why am I a sales manager? I’m making less money than I was before, I’m responsible for all these people, and it’s like, so stressful and it’s a thankless job, especially when you’re new in sales management, and I figured it out. And I want to share everything that I learned, all of the tools, the tips, the tricks on how to really be a successful sales manager and, you know, the the words that I live by are teaching empowerment, right. And so that’s really what I do with the sales leaders, I teach them empowerment, because a lot of times, the sales, I found that sales managers, they think, when they don’t lead their team well that their sales skills are low, right, they don’t think that they’re as good salespeople as they thought, so they’re doing sales training, right. So, a lot of times it’s like no, you’re a good salesperson, you’re doing the right things, it’s you need some leadership development. And what I do is I marry those two things, the sales skills and the leadership development, because everything that I do to develop the leader leads to revenue, like, we’re not doing anything just to you know make you feel warm and fuzzy inside. So, yeah. 

 Christopher Smith   
You know, it can be so isolating when you’re new in management and you feel so alone. Was there a specific moment that you remember making that like you’re having that individual aha moment where like, I think I’m beginning to get this? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
I think, so I had this employee, the salesperson that told me, he said, “Wesleyne, you have this unique ability to know everything that’s going on without micromanaging us at all.” And I was like, “Okay, great. I’m doing what I’m supposed to be doing,” right, like they know that I know everything that’s happening, but I’m not annoying them. I’m not calling and checking and when is this closing, when is that happening. Let’s travel together. I wasn’t doing that, so I knew that that was the moment that I was like, okay, I figured it out. 

 Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. That’s a great story. We’re coming up on our end time here on Sales Lead Dog. I’ve really enjoyed having you on and listening to you. If people want to reach out and connect with you Wesleyne, what’s the best way for them to do that? 

 Wesleyne Greer   
The absolute best way is on LinkedIn, I’m Wesleyne Greer on LinkedIn, I post a lot of content, lots of videos, good information for people to follow me and reach out, connect with me I would love to chat with anyone. 

 Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. Thank you again for coming on Sales Lead Dog, it’s been great listening to talk. 

 Wesleyne Greer   
Thank you so much for having me. It’s been a pleasure. 

 Outro 
As we end this discussion on Sales Lead Dog, be sure to subscribe to catch all our episodes on social media. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. Watch the videos on YouTube, and you can also find our episodes on our website at Empellorcrm.com/salesleaddog. Sales Lead Dog is supported by Empellor CRM, delivering objectively better CRM for business guaranteed. 

Quotes

  • “It’s all about the three P’s: People, Process and Profit. In that order.” 
  • “I say it’s all about the three P’s and its people, process and profit. And I put profit at the end, and people at the beginning because essentially without the right people in place, you’re not going to be profitable and building a process without having the right people in place, you won’t ensure that you have profit.” (4:48-5:12)
  • “I tell people that when I got into sales, I finally figured out what I wanted to be when I grew up.” (6:31-6:37)
  • “I always always tell sales managers and sales leaders it’s about solid sales skills….You can teach them your products, your services, you can teach them the technology. But what you can’t teach somebody is really solid sales skills.” (9:49-10:06)
  • “You build your sales process not based on what the corporate office wants it to be or what your boss wants it to be. You make your sales process off of what’s working in the field. And the way you figure out what’s working in the field is you talk to the top performers.” (15:48-16:03)
  • “When I ask a sales leader, ‘Who is your salesperson or who are your top salespeople?’, they always give me the one who’s hitting quota. But to me, it’s more about consistency. Sometimes people can have a really great year, and then they can be duds for the next two years. So a definition of success is consistency.” (20:50-21:14)
  • “You have to do a postmortem because it’s ok to lose a deal, but it’s not ok to lose a deal the same way twice.” (28:10-28:18)

Links

TransformedSales.com
Transformed Sales: Overview | LinkedIn
Wesleyne Greer | LinkedIn

Empellor CRM Website
Empellor CRM LinkedIn

Podcast production and show notes provided by FIRESIDE Marketing