Podcast

The Customer Defines Your Value Prop: Doug Vail

How does the transition to private equity change an organization? On this episode of Sales Lead Dog, Doug Vail, Chief Revenue Officer at Industrial Inspection & Analysis, talks with host Chris Smith about his unexpected move to sales leadership as a result of a private equity buyout, and how private equity puts the company focus on continued growth — even in times of hardship.

Doug, who started his career as a mechanical engineer, never imagined that one day he would be the CRO of a rapidly expanding business like IIA. But he does credit his engineering background to his methodical sales process, and his ability to continually grow and learn from his mistakes. At this point in his career, he admits that what set him apart was his commitment to discipline — to getting up everyday ready to “practice his craft.”

As for his relationship to CRM? Doug says he can’t imagine running a company of any size without it. Tune in this week to learn about private equity, unexpected career journeys, and more!

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Transcript:

Thu, 7/29 2:26PM • 34:47 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS 
sales, crm, people, customers, business, company, private equity, implement, role, engineers, discipline, bit, inspection, year, thought, success, erp, grow, cro, revenue 

SPEAKERS 
Doug Vail, Christopher Smith 

Intro 
Welcome to the Sales Lead Dog Podcast hosted by CRM technology and sales process expert Christopher Smith, talking with sales leaders that have separated themselves from the rest of the pack. Listen to find out how the best of the best achieve success with their team and CRM technology. And remember, unless you are the lead dog, the view never changes. 

Christopher Smith   
Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. Today we have joining us Doug Vail out of Atlanta, Georgia. Doug is with Industrial Inspection & Analysis. Doug, welcome to Sales Lead Dog.  

Doug Vail   
Thanks, Chris. Great to be here.  

Christopher Smith   
Doug, tell us about your role and your company. 

Doug Vail   
So I’m the Chief Revenue Officer for a privately-held testing and inspection company called Industrial Inspection & Analysis. We were founded about five years ago, and over the course of that time, we’ve acquired about 17 different testing, inspection, certification, and calibration companies across the US and in Canada. We do field and lab types of inspections and testing all across the country and end markets anywhere from aerospace down to the utility markets where we’re doing powerplant inspections, pulp & paper refinery, so broad range of energy equipment that we inspect, as well as precision manufacturing for aerospace, medical, and even some communication devices. So it’s been a really interesting business to get involved with. The, my experience has been over the last 20 years is in the industrial market, so brought a lot of knowledge of the purchasing side of the businesses and how we can implement a real sales strategy here. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. The question I always like to start with on this podcast is tell me the three things that you think have contributed the most to your success? 

Doug Vail   
The first thing was is I, my, my first sales job didn’t come until about seven years after I graduated, I’m a mechanical engineer by degree, thought that, you know, sales guys weren’t really important in my world. And so I went into manufacturing, and then just sort of being able to build a relationship, some rapport with the buying side pretty quickly that I’ve been in your seat and I’ve looked for solutions that maybe I’m not getting. And my frustration always with sales guys had been I don’t really know where they’re adding value to my organization, or to what I’m trying to accomplish. And the great thing about my first sales job was it was a really innovative welding technology company, that allowed me to go into the industry, industries that I worked in and now serve and provide them with the linkage between, here’s some options that you may not even know exist, and it was a, I was able to quickly build that rapport. And then I think the other piece too, is discipline that, you know, being an engineer you, we like, we like regimen, and we like things to follow a schedule and a process. And even though you know, right out of the gate, it was a struggle, I mean, anybody who gets into sales and doesn’t have those struggles is really quite fortunate in my mind. But I think we all suffer a little bit. But having the discipline to get up every day, practice my messaging, practice my craft, and get better and better at it. And then over time, I found that I got a tremendous amount of confidence, not only in front of customers, but within my own organization, to, to help us, you know, strategically start maneuvering through the world of sales. And so I, I look for that in people that I hire too is looking for that kind of track record of, of discipline and confidence and belief that they can get anything done, given the opportunity. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. I know several engineers that have had very successful sales careers. What do you think that is? You mentioned I think some of those attributes about engineers. Do you think there’s more or you know, there’s something about engineers in the way you accomplish things that make you such great salespeople? 

Doug Vail   
I would, I would like to believe that. I generally find more engineer in sales engineers than I find salespeople in engineers. But I also think that there’s a, there’s a, there’s a practical part of sales that that process piece just fit with me. I didn’t, I didn’t really know what I was doing when I got my first job. My, my boss, his name’s Mike Ledford, gave me the opportunity. He and I’d known each other for several years, and he knew my personality and my background and my, my father actually was a 32-year guy at American Express. So I had it in there somewhere, and he’s figured he’d give me a shot and then what he did was allow me to sort of figure my way through what that was. And I was able to, you know, take a lot of what he taught me, and then put a process together so that if I put steps A, B, and C together, and I didn’t get result D, I could go back and look at maybe along the way where that fell apart what I didn’t do as well as I could have or where I missed the mark with one of those steps. And so I don’t, I don’t necessarily like to call sales a process, but if you don’t understand the breadth of what the process looks like, you can’t really go in there and coach and learn from it as you move through, whether you’re developing somebody, or in your own career trying to be successful. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. You mentioned earlier about really, one of the keys that you think you’re so successful is that you’re able to really come from your customer’s perspective or you’ve been in their shoes. For new sales people or people getting into that industry, how do you teach that, or how do you give them that skill? 

Doug Vail   
Every every company that I’ve worked for had implemented a sales strategy. The messaging has always been the biggest focus that I have in the first 60 to 90 days, and really making sure I understand where their value is. And it’s interesting in a lot of cases where maybe the ownership or even the even the CEO of a company believes that their value is and and having to kind of reprogram them that their messaging might be needed, we need to modify that a little bit, because that’s a little bit more looking at who we are versus what we’re doing out. And for a sales guy to be able to go out and provide that value for a customer rather than, you know, kind of what’s in it for us, it’s been transformative. And this inspection company, when we we got in here, the CEO and I got here about the same time, a little over a year ago. And we were both looking at it. And we both believe like the things that we do day in and day out actually are what protects lives. And it’s not just inspecting a boiler tube, or, you know, this little widget over here that they’re building, it’s about making sure that something doesn’t break later on and wound or worse another human being and, and when we we got the whole company together and we’re talking about what it is that IIA is going to be going forward, they embraced the concept, they embrace the fact that we are all doing different things day in and day out but with one purpose, which is protecting the lives of those people that go to work every day and making sure they get home in the same condition as they left. And that just resonates. And so when I take a new salesperson, if you give them that kind of this is what we’re really about and make sure you understand this when you’re standing in front of your customer, I think the I think the verbiage and the vocals that they project are a lot different than let me figure out how I can test your your boiler tubes or your turban or whatever it might be. 

Christopher Smith   
Right, which really, that’s not going to resonate. Like we, we’re about saving lives. That, that’s a totally different perspective and that completely grabs people. Thinking back to your start in sales, this is one of my favorite questions to ask people, what do you wish you had been taught back then?  

Doug Vail   
That it’s gonna be tough. I really, I really thought because the funny thing is one of the one of the funny stories that I get to tell about my career is before I even took the job, he invited, Mike invited me in to sit in a sales meeting with all his guys. And they were at different levels, they had been there different times. And I thought, well, man, surely I can do this, look at these bunch of knuckleheads out here, right? Like, like, I’m sure I can do this and I can be successful. Well, you know, that first year, I was all about going out and presenting to whoever would listen to what I had to say. And I was crushing it. But the one thing I wasn’t doing was I wasn’t paying attention to what they were saying enough and listening, truly listening to what they’re offering up is I need your help. And I was just so proud of myself presenting that I forgot to go ask how I can help them and, and provide a solution. So I think that, I think that, you know, having the discipline to know there’s gonna be some struggles and it’s going to take some time, but then also really learning how to listen a little bit better and act on things that are really, they’re customers begging you to help them or offer them some guidance or assistance. And I was just missing it completely. So there’s, there’s that opportunity for everybody. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh, yeah, yeah. Tell us about your transition from sales into sales leadership, how did that happen? 

Doug Vail   
That’s a, that’s a pretty interesting story, too. So I’ve been working for about three and a half years in the southeast region. And we got involved with a private equity transaction, transaction where somebody came in and bought the original owners out. And my boss was because we’re going to get a bigger role within that new organization. And, you know, he, he tapped me to take on this, this responsibility. And, frankly, I didn’t really want it, I was really enjoying my, you know, everything that I did, the amount of time invested I did, my success was rewarding to me. And having come from a manufacturing background, you’re always dependent on a lot of other people to be successful. And I didn’t miss that. And then when given the opportunity, I had to think about it for quite a while before I actually said yes, the thing that I realized is what I missed was, was actually coaching people and helping people achieve all that they could, that they could achieve. And so I found that even taking a role where now my peers were now my subordinates, if you will, and I was leading them, that I could, I could still have a great relationship with them and continue to help them improve what they were doing day in and day out. But that’s, that was kind of it. And then after that, I just continued to get bigger roles within an organization, we built it from about 100 million to almost three quarters of a billion, went through through some different acquisitions and whatnot. And I was, I was very fortunate I got, I got offered a lot of really nice roles to take on some huge responsibilities on a global scale that I can tell you, I never would have thought I’d been involved with sitting at the University of Alabama studying mechanical engineering, so. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. What did what did he see in you looking back, and when he’s looking at you, he had to pick somebody, he picked you? Why do you pick you? 

Doug Vail   
I think it was how great my hair looked back then. No, I I don’t know. I think that, I think the discipline in the process is kind of what he embraced was, was this guy kind of get this guy gets it and, and he can help coach people to be better at whatever they’re struggling with. And and, and that’s, that was given the opportunity. And then the CEO, Bill Varner, at the time, he, he saw the same kind of discipline, it was like, you know, he was a Citadel graduate, great guy, and and just just gave me that kind of an opportunity to grow. And so when we bought other companies it was going, let’s implement this strategy, let’s coach these guys on, on how we can do this thing. And, frankly, not everybody bought into it. And that happens too. But but the ones that stick around and learn, they continued to have great careers wherever they went, wherever they went to as well. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. Let’s talk a bit about, you know, a lot of times when people transition to sales leadership, they leave their current company, and they go to a new company, new role, but you stayed in the same one. That can be a really tough transition for some people where like you said, “I’m, we’re all peers, but now I’m your boss.” That’s, that can be a very tricky transition. How did you handle that?  

Doug Vail   
I guess I did it okay. We kept growing the business. There, you know, the reality is, is when, when you’re when you’re given that responsibility, I basically had to tell them that I felt like there were some, there was some dead weight on this team. And we’re gonna have to make some tough calls on a lot of these people. And I just told them, let’s immediately be honest and upfront with people and assess where they’re at and where they can go, and what needs to happen. And so good, bad, or indifferent. It was I don’t want to say it was a bull in a china shop, but it wasn’t like we were gonna wait around long. We needed to, private equity, it’s always how quick can you get me to that next level, right? And so for them, it was like let’s not waste time. Let’s look at the team. Let’s assess and let’s tell them where they need to get working on or in some cases, maybe cut bait and move on, too. So there was some carnage in the wake. There was other guys that just unbelievable transformation in their what they were doing day in and day out. And the results were super impressive. But we kept growing and kept adding more people around the world. And conceptually, this this sales strategy that we’re implementing, was being embraced by the right people and kept driving good success. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s great. What’s it like, or or how’s it different, I guess is a better question, how’s it different working in private equity when you know when you’re owned by private equity versus a more traditional company that may not have those same types of pressures? 

Doug Vail   
I don’t know that the pressure is that much different. The expectation is, is, I think at an elevated height with with private equity. You know, if you’re a $50 million business privately held by, you know, maybe the original owners and and things are not going great because of economic reasons or maybe we’ve had some tough losses of customers that really impacted us negatively in the long haul, their, their their temperament’s a little different, I think they’re like, “Hey, we’re used to this. We’ve been doing this for 30 years. And we know the ebbs and flows.” Versus private equity there, the pressure’s pretty intense on a day to day basis that we’re always looking for ways to grow. So something like a COVID we’ve, like we’ve had this year, totally unexpected, nobody’s ever had practice on what to do here. And it gave my organism, my team, me  a pause to really rethink how we do things day in and day out, and what are we going to do differently and, and try to churn that maybe a little bit quicker than we would have if we were just, you know, we were just a, you know, $50 million, whatever now. So I think that the the speed in response is heightened at that level, because you have a lot more people interested in what’s going on and how we can do something different and better. 

Christopher Smith   
Out of those changes you’ve had to make dealing with COVID, do you think those are going to stick moving forward? Or those things, or do you expect more adjustments once this pandemic’s over? 

Doug Vail   
Yeah, if you can tell me when the pandemic’s gonna be over, Chris, that’d be great insight. I would really appreciate that. 

Christopher Smith   
Heard it first of all here.  

Doug Vail   
Yeah, I think we’re gonna have to keep a lot of these practices implemented. Weekly, daily kind of activity checks. And I’m not a big micromanager, I don’t need to tell, talk to everybody and find out what you’re doing today. But I do, I do want to weekly understand, you know, “Hey, how’s it going? What’s changing? What are your customers saying? What, uh, you know, are they gonna let you back on site to have some of these face-to-face meetings or are we going to continue to do, you know, Zoom meetings and Teams meetings?” or whatever they may be. And I think for the most part, the skill set that we develop over that period of time will certainly help us no matter what the conditions, you know, evolve to over the next 12 months. If they stay the same, we’re ready. If they change, then we can get back out there. And this team that I’ve got is, is you can tell they’re all chomping at the bit. They’re handshake people, they want to go look in the eye and and have you believe in what they are. Because of that, it’s a lot different doing it through a TV or a computer monitor.  

Christopher Smith   
Yeah.  

Doug Vail   
But those skills that they’ve developed over this course this year, I think will definitely benefit us long-term. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s great. That’s great. What are you guys doing to cultivate management candidates in your organization? What are you looking for?  

Doug Vail   
So we’re, I’m hiring pretty talented people right now. I think that we’re we’re, as we grow, we’ll bring in some probably lower level, maybe even entry level type people that want to get into the business and develop some skill in sales. But for managers, I’m looking for track records of success in doing a lot of different things. I always, when I when I do hire, I like to see the individuals in selling situations. So if they’re standing up and doing a presentation, they’re in front of an interview panel and learning or, you know, just showing us what they’re really all about, that gives me an idea of how well they’re going to do in front of a, you know, in front of a roomful of customers and how they react and respond. I also look for people, frankly, that I think I could enjoy hanging out with after hours, you know, talking business, talking family, having a beer drinking, you know, you know, eating a steak, whatever it might be, and just enjoy being around them. So I think they have to fit us culturally just as much as their their skill set appeals to us as well. 

Christopher Smith   
How do you measure success for yourself personally, and then also success for your team? 

Doug Vail   
So when you’re the Chief Revenue Officer, there’s really only one thing that you need to worry about. I told him, I told my boss the other day I said, “Yeah, sales, sales is easy, except for the revenue part.” Predicting it, Owning it. I do embrace that. Actually, that’s the that’s the part of every gig that I’ve ever taken. Since the first, you know, sales leadership role I’ve got is just owning that piece of it. Like that’s my responsibility. When we’re not hitting the numbers, it’s my fault. It’s something that I need to do better and different to try to get us back on track. So I like to believe that I push that down into my leadership, my frontline leaders and the people that they manage is that we own this is us, this is what we do. If we’re not, if we’re not making the calls, and we’re not getting the revenue cranked up, it’s, it’s our fault. And that’s not that’s where it starts and stops. So own, having that ownership, that level of ownership, I think has always proved, provided well for me. And it, I wouldn’t say keeps me up at night necessarily, but I can tell you it’s the first thing I think when I wake up, probably the last thing I think of before I go to bed. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. Tell me about the deal you lost that hurt the most and what changed about you from that experience. 

Doug Vail   
So it was actually really early on in my leadership, I had another guy that took my role in the southeast. And I had built a really nice base of business in the southeast and was really proud of it. And it was probably the second year and one of my first customers, I found out from my guy that he was gonna go with a different supplier for some work in his, in his boiler. And I called him and you know, we were, we were personal friends I would like to think, and talked through it with him. And it was just really frustrating that it was as simple as look, we never saw you or your guy and we, these other guys were really interested in our business and demonstrated that we were important to them and, and what have you and and that struck me is we can never rest. We’ve got to always be on point and never take any of our clients for granted. And even if it’s as simple as a phone call, or a card, or an email, or whatever it might be just to touch base and let them know that we’re here for them when they need us, that was a really important thing. And frankly, that’s how I grew, grew, my region was planting seeds, and then just kind of falling back with people. And one of the biggest deals I ever got was not one that came up during a meeting, but it came in about a year later. And it started off as a $60,000 deal and turned into about a $4 million deal. So yeah, but it had nothing, it wasn’t because of what I said the first time, it was just “Hey, man, I want to be here for you,” and just staying in touch with them. So I always value that and appreciate salespeople that keep those kinds of relationships always around and alive.  

Christopher Smith   
Do you share that story with your team?  

Doug Vail   
More often than you would know. Yeah, I think, I think they ought to hear it, because we’ve all lived through one or two of those. I gotta believe that. So but yeah, I think when you share stories you always hear like, yeah, something like that happened. Somebody actually might have even a better worse story than mine, you know, really, really affected them, so. 

Christopher Smith   
How do you keep rejection in perspective and communicate that skill to your sales team, you know, the new guys? 

Doug Vail   
I got, I got an, I got enough people that are fairly thick-skinned, I think they’re fairly seasoned, this group here. Whereas, you know, some of the other companies, I’ve taken on roles with some newer individuals, and there’s a lot of frustration and some, you know, you can coach them up, and you can help them through and help them figure out maybe why that it’s not really working out, or what we’re doing differently, or what we should be doing differently rather, and helping them get through that. But a lot of people have bailed. I’ve seen a lot of talented, potentially talented people that just can’t handle that. And they end up going back to whatever they were doing before and I’m not knocking what they were doing, but they might have given up a little bit early. And I have a similar story, right that first year where, whoo, I was so busy. I thought I was doing all the right things and you look down and you got $0 of revenue to show for it. Have you got to kind of keep that in perspective and say, “Look, it takes time, but we’re gonna help you get through this.”  

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s awesome. Let’s start talking CRM, one of my favorite topics.  

Doug Vail   
Alright. 

Christopher Smith   
CRM, do you love it? Or do you hate it? 

Doug Vail   
I don’t know how you run a complex sales organization without one, I can tell you that. I, I, I’ve seen the good and bad of them. But without it, I don’t know how you have any kind of predictability to your business to help make really important decisions like do we hire the next 10 guys that we need to go do all this testing and inspection and those kinds of things. So I think they’re hugely important. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. So in terms of your role as CRO versus maybe a role of VP of Sales or Sales Manager, how is your perspective, excuse me, perspective or use of CRM different as a CRO versus the different sales leadership roles? 

Doug Vail   
Like well, so it encompasses all the sales and marketing, right. And I think that’s the the big thing is my responsibility is to every dollar of revenue generated. And so to have a CRM where the sales team is actually managing through it, and oh, by the way, marketing is populated information and leads and information. And oh, by the way, there’s also a lot of relationships that are owned by operational people. So regional managers, lab leaders, lab managers, having all that information into a system where we can constantly communicate with the customers, or, you know, give them updates on what we’re doing as a business, let them know that we just acquired this other lab that now provides this service that we didn’t current we didn’t have previously. So having all of that responsibility to grow, grow, grow the revenue is, is probably the only is the biggest difference. You know, having a Sales Manager who focuses on that blocking and tackling aspect of the field guys all the time, versus somebody who’s kind of looking at it going, we got to keep communication going, we got to update our social media, we got to, we got to update our website, we got to manage all this information out there. It’s a little bit, it’s a little bit different. And thankfully, I got a great team that helps me keep it all together. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. What do, thinking back over your entire career, what was your biggest struggle with leveraging CRM technology and supporting the sales process? And how did you overcome that? 

Doug Vail   
I think sometimes the expectation of what the CRM can actually do and how it links to the other pieces of the business, functional business and, and I’ve seen a lot of cases where we want to try to make sure that our ERP system and our CRM, they talk really well together. I’ve never seen that work out very well. And so I think that if, I think it’s almost as important, I don’t know if it’s as important, but if someone comes up with one, I’m really I’m all ears. But I think we, we have the CRM as kind of here’s our future, right, here the ERP has shown us what our history has been. And those two things not necessarily should never touch or cross. But they’re separate systems to tell us how we’re doing, what we can do differently, and where we can improve. And the CRM is just always kind of that lightning in the front that we need to have driving everything forward. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. Because you, you have such broad reach as CRO, what advice do you have for a, another CRO that might be having difficulty aligning the technology leadership to better support the sales and marketing functions?  

Doug Vail   
Man I, the hard, the hardest thing is, so when I got here, we had a CRM in place. But it wasn’t set up with with a sales management, customer management really in place, and how, what is this going to look like when we’re when we’re really implementing it well? So what was the long range, it was more of like, we just want to be able to see how many activities are happening and quotes and stuff like that. They didn’t get a whole lot of training, the system wasn’t efficient either. So I can understand somebody coming into that situation. And I think you’ve got to, you’ve got to set some reality to this is what needs to happen. And it’s going to take some time. And oh, by the way, it’s going to take some investment, be it third party, somebody to help you get what you need to structure this thing so that CRM is sales friendly. Guys that use a CRM don’t want to do two hours of inputs after a long day of driving around and seeing half a dozen customers or whatever it might be. You want it to be, you want it to be efficient to manage what they’ve done. So I think if you either get a third party to help you or you bring somebody into the organization to help you build it the way that it should be, and that’s not always a comfortable discussion to have, but I think it’s, I’ve been fortunate enough where my opinion was valued enough where I could get that that sort of change done. And we’ve been working extremely hard for a year and we’ve transformed what we’re doing in our CRM. And we can still get better but we’re getting a lot, we’ve gotten a lot better in a year. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. user adoption is always a big part of any technology, especially CRM. And whenever we talk with a client, it’s we like to say, what’s your, what’s your why? You know, if I’m a salesperson, and you’re talking to me about CRM, I want to know what’s in it for me. And so what what’s that why you communicate to your team, you know, about CRM? 

Doug Vail   
I think that, I think you bring up a great point. There’s, there’s generally more than just the sales guys that are involved with what goes in and out of a CRM. And if you don’t have all of their inputs and have them buying into how you’re building in the success and the the transformation that you’re trying to implement, you’re, you’re going to ultimately alienate somebody. So I think having them be a part of the discussion, and having them tell you what they like about what we’re doing, and what’s a little bit more of a pain for them, then you can hopefully engineer a little bit of that out so that it’s not so you know, complicated and painful for them to adopt. And that goes for anybody, but for salespeople specifically, I love to hear what they’ve done with other CRMs and what’s worked for them. And, you know, a lot of them are like, well, we we had one, but nobody really ever used it. And that’s, that always makes me like really concerned because this, these things aren’t cheap. And they and they certainly can deliver what you want when you, when you push them to kind of get the results that you’re looking for and build the expectations out early. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. And you touched on it earlier too where CRM is not just for the sales guys. It’s sales, it’s marketing, it’s operations, anyone who interfaces with the customer needs to have that access and that insight to what’s going on. 

Doug Vail   
Yeah. And the more the more you can, the more you can engineer into it, Chris, obviously, it’s beneficial. And I think, you know, again, we’ve been working on a year, most of it on the front end stuff, we got the whole back end that we want to get implemented too where, where there is that transition from we won the deal, here’s the work orders, let’s go to work. And that thing ultimately comes back into the into the invoicing side. And now you do have that engagement with the ERP that you’re going to draw on later anyway. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s a huge piece. That, that’s another piece I love to talk about with companies about, okay, the deal’s won, now what happens? There’s usually a whole long list of stuff, we have to do this, you know, accounting needs to get involved, you know, you know, everybody, there’s so much stuff that has to happen. And if you do it right, like you’re saying, you can, you know, support a lot of that business, improve a lot of those interactions, and drive out a lot of the inefficiencies. There’s a lot of opportunities there for people.  

Doug Vail   
Totally.  

Christopher Smith   
Yeah. Well, we are coming up on our time on this episode of Sales Lead Dog. Doug, I really appreciate you coming on. If people want to reach out and connect with you, learn more about you and your company, what’s the best way for them to get in touch with you? 

Doug Vail   
Yeah, probably the easiest way to connect with me, all my information on LinkedIn is available. I get plenty of emails from anybody glad to glad to connect with just about anybody. It’s Doug Vail. I think I’m the only one that’s in Atlanta, but there might be one other one. He would have had to move in in the last three years. But but you can find me there. Industrial-ia.com is our is our website. Go check us out. Really doing some amazing things out there with a lot of talented folks across North America. And yeah, I look forward to exploring opportunities with anybody. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, it’s great. I love, I’m really glad you came on the show, as when we talked in our prep, I explained I really liked to have a lot of diverse companies on the show because to me, I don’t care what business you’re in, there’s always something really cool and interesting about your business. You definitely have shared some great stuff with us today. I really appreciate it. So thanks again for coming on Sales Lead Dog.  

Doug Vail   
Chris, I’m really glad you had me, and you guys do a great job. I think the webcast or the podcast you guys are running is fantastic. I’ve enjoyed every one of them.  

Christopher Smith   
Awesome. Thank you. 

Outro 
As we end this discussion on Sales Lead Dog, be sure to subscribe to catch all our episodes on social media. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. Watch the videos on YouTube, and you can also find our episodes on our website at Empellorcrm.com/salesleaddog. Sales Lead Dog is supported by Empellor CRM, delivering objectively better CRM for business guaranteed. 

Quotes:

  • “Private equity is always about: ‘how quickly can you get me to the next level?’” (19:50-19:54)

Links:

Industrial Inspection & Analysis Website
Doug Vail LinkedIn
Industrial Inspection & Analysis LinkedIn
Empellor CRM Website
If you have any question on how Empellor CRM can help you? Contact Christopher Smith

Podcast production and show notes provided by FIRESIDE Marketing