Podcast

What is your Why? – Kayleb Bowes

“I’m still a work in progress,” says Kayleb Bowes, Vice President of Sales at Nationwide Laboratory Services. Throughout his career, Kayleb has been committed to learning and growing. And for him, that all comes down to knowing his why. 

As a medical sales rep and leader, Kayleb can find part of his why in his company’s mission — Nationwide is helping doctors diagnose patients and save lives every day. But for him, it goes deeper than that. Beyond the numbers, Kayleb measures his team’s success by company culture. He wants people to feel appreciated, cared for, and to have fun. And having that human-centered approach helps him stay connected to the importance of his work as a sales leader. 

This week, hear Kayleb talk about how he motivates his team through wins and losses, and his transformation from CRM hater to CRM lover once he realized just how important CRM technology is to fulfilling your mission. 

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Transcript:

Fri, 2/26 1:56PM • 59:57 

SUMMARY KEYWORDS 
sales, team, crm, reps, losses, people, leader, important, company, meeting, success, learning, calls, nationwide, switched, changing, florida, notes, doctors, transpire 

SPEAKERS 
Kayleb Bowes, Christopher Smith 

Intro 
Welcome to the Sales Lead Dog Podcast hosted by CRM technology and sales process expert Christopher Smith, talking with sales leaders that have separated themselves from the rest of the pack. Listen to find out how the best of the best achieve success with their team and CRM technology. And remember, unless you are the lead dog, the view never changes. 

Christopher Smith   
Welcome to Sales Lead Dog. Today we have joining us Kaleb Bowes. Kaleb, welcome to Sales Lead Dog. 

Kayleb Bowes   
Hey Chris, happy to be here. Thanks for having me. 

Christopher Smith   
I’m happy to have you on. Kayleb, tell us about your current role and your company. 

Kayleb Bowes   
Perfect. So I’m the VP of Sales at Nationwide Laboratory Services. We’re a full service diagnostic laboratory based in Boca Raton, Florida. When I say full service it’s just not one particular item, we literally do the whole gamut. Nationwide actually has a tremendous story in the fact that I want to say we’re not a 30 year old startup but we’ve been around for 30 years. And we were grandfathered in with all these insurances and we’re really rebranding and just building the company back the way it should be. 

Christopher Smith   
Well, that’s awesome. That’s awesome. So thinking of, you know, back over your entire career, what are the three things that have really driven your success. 

Kayleb Bowes   
So, one I would say that, keeping my priorities in check. Right. I think that if your priorities are in check, that work’s gonna follow too, so for me that’s going to be that, that God right is going to be number one that my relationship there. Two, my wife, we’ve all heard, it happy wife happy, happy life and, I mean, for me if I’m having a good day at home then I think it always transpires to same thing in the job, right. And then three is work. I’m always gonna give 120% but those first two are always my top priority. And the same thing goes with my team, right, if something happens and it’s family related, that’s the utmost importance. I feel like if we take care of them and genuinely care about them, it’s going to translate to, you know, happy employees and just that that camaraderie that we have. Um, second would be, we did an action selling course when I was in the field that totally transcended the way that I sold. So a couple things there that you want the clients to first of all like and trust you, not by talking about their dog or their kids but knowing that you genuinely care about them and ask the right questions, right, that you’re not just the average salesperson, that you genuinely care. Then it’s going to be the company, right, that they’ve got it, like, and trust the company. And then third is the product, then we talk about the product. So that was huge. And then knowing your why. I stress that to the team all the time that this isn’t just your normal eight to five, like, why are you here, not just to collect a paycheck. And one of the reasons I love Nationwide is because we have a tremendous why. 80% of a doctor’s diagnosis is based on their blood work. So we really, we’re not doctors, but we really are saving people’s lives, and if that doesn’t motivate you, then we’re probably not the right place for them to be. 

Christopher Smith   
Right. Yeah I love the why. That to me is such an important thing. I actually had a call with my, my team, a while back and it just dawned on me, we were coming in I wasn’t even planning on talking about this, and I just said to them, I’m like, “Does anybody know why I started this company?” Nobody did. I’m like, let me tell you my why. And I think it’s important that people know that, and that they have it for themselves, so important. How did you get your start in sales? 

Kayleb Bowes   
So, finished school. I knew I wanted to get into medical sales, like I just, I knew and people were like that’s what you want to do, and of course I knew that the money was good too, but everybody wanted three years experience for an entry level job. So a private company gave me my first start and I mean I’ll always be thankful for them. It was actually in the lab industry, and I promised myself I’d never go back to labs, but here I am now. And you know what, it was like a family there and they taught us, I don’t wanna say everything they taught us was the right way. But for me, it gave me my shot and being always want to go like I’m an underdog, right, so all I needed was for them to give me that shot to prove myself and then I just took it from there. But I will always be forever grateful for that first company because it’s like banging your head up against the wall when you do want to start into the medical sales, because how do you have three years experience at an entry level job which I’m sure so many people are familiar with, but I started in labs and, you know, it’s come full circle. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s great. What do you wish you had been taught when you were first starting in sales? 

Kayleb Bowes   
So I would say that there’s not one way to be successful on a sales career, right. Not to go off script, but to be genuine. I think that’s something that you you can’t teach, to be genuine and to kind of create your own style. My, like I said, going back to the first one, my first job it was scripted, and I felt like people can see that and it kind of comes off as hokey and when I started to have success was when I kind of made it my own and really being genuine and showing people that you care about. 

 Christopher Smith   
What’s your craziest, wackiest sales story over your career? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
There, there’s so many. If you don’t mind, I’ll probably give you two. 

 Christopher Smith   
Go for it. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
I was working at Bloomberg and I was selling to the Fortune 500 companies in Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and Florida. And our VP came down to ride along with us, and it’s Florida, everyone knows Florida is a unique animal, and we’re going into this office to meet with their general counsel, and he’s like, why aren’t you in a suit. I was like, well, it’s Florida, we don’t we don’t really wear full suits here and he was wearing a suit so we went into that first meeting and the general counsels’ in flip flops, shorts, and a T-shirt. Needless to say, he never came back down and was wearing a suit again, he understood after that first meeting. So, Florida is a unique animal anywhere else you know I travel throughout the country, I’ll wear a suit but Florida is unique in that sense. 

 Christopher Smith   
Don’t wear one in Denver, either. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Right. I think it’s I think it’s changing. I actually just had a big meeting with our Director of Operations and a prospective client. And I really do think it’s changing because he came in and a plaid shirt and shorts and I just was like you know what I respected it just because of the uniqueness and how things are changing. And then I’d say the second one is when I was in the field, we had a strategic account manager that told me I had a 2% chance to land this very, very big, very big deal. And for me that’s just like a challenge, and I’m like, okay, I am, I’m going to show you, like, you’re the strategic account manager, you think we’ve got no shot, and I’m gonna grind and I’m gonna make sure it happens and lo and behold, that ended up being one of our best clients to date, so. 

Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. I love it. Tell us about the transition to sales leadership, was that easy for you or was it difficult? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
So, it’s still a work in progress. Right. And anything that you do I think that you’ve got to constantly learning and growing, and that’s me right now. And I bounce a lot of things off of podcasts that I listen to, yours being one of them, Craig Rochelle, and then of course my wife too. So there’s been numerous times where I do something, I’m like, you know what I could have handled that better. And I think one of the things that I’m realizing is just, just wait a second, right, before I respond, because I’m always moving 100 miles a minute. And that’s been one of the biggest learning lessons is just, you know, pump the brakes and just wait to think about it, wait to respond. And then I would say that the team around me has also really helped. I work very closely with our Director of Operations and our Director of Client Services. And those guys, like us three as a team really run like a, like a full, a full team like me and the Director of Operations are running 100 miles a minute, and we needed a Director of Client Services sometimes to just tone us back down. So it’s, it’s been a unique transition. I really do love it. But I also love the fact that I still go out with the team too and I’m in the field. So it’s like that perfect blend of the leadership role, and the financials, along with still going to some meetings and keeping my feet wet there. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I love that you said pump the brakes, because it made me think of something that I use as a, as a leader. My wife and I after our first child was born, we took a parenting class, and the person instructing the class said, “Hey you know what, when your kid is misbehaving or has an issue, you don’t have to respond right away. You can just sit and be quiet for a while, and let them stew for a little bit. And you don’t have to jump right in and react, let. Give them some space, give it some time and see how it develops.” I use that, not every day, but I use that when when there’s issues. I have a really great team, it’s not something that comes up really a lot, but it’s a very useful tool to just pump the brakes. Sit and see what happens. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Yeah. Gather, gather yourself, right. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, yeah. No, that’s great. What do you think has been your biggest challenge as a sales leader? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Changing the culture. Like I said Nationwide has so much potential, and we’re doing so many great things. I don’t want to say that things were being done wrong before, I think they just could have been done differently. And we’re doing that now and we have such a good team and they respond really well, but it’s just kind of doing that 180 and building that culture and saying, “Hey listen, like I know this is different than what you were doing before. But just trust me and the results in a short and a short time have been really really good.” And again, I couldn’t ask for a better team, because I feel like if I was somewhere else. And even being younger in this role right that is, that’s a challenge right, and there’s people that are older than you. They’re like, well, you know, it’s been none of that. So they’ve really gotten on board and it’s showing in our results. 

 Christopher Smith   
I love that. Culture I think is, it’s the foundation of success. If you don’t have a strong culture, it’s incredibly difficult to succeed. Yeah. I’m sorry, what, what role does empathy play in in your culture? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Huge. Alright. Um, well, it goes back to what I was saying with with family and stuff like that, right. If the team knows that we care about them, it goes a long way. I’m a big proponent in people will make less money and work for you harder and be happy if you treat them right than if you pay them more money and you treat them like dogs. So, they all know that we care, right, I don’t have to tell them all the time. But I’m also a big believer in, and words of affirmation and I think my team responds really well to that, even even teams like even people at the lab that aren’t part of the sales team and the sales staff, just telling them thank you and like you’re doing a great job goes a long way, and they’re so thankful. So I make that an emphasis that even if it’s something small, I let them know no it’s a big deal, and you are part, especially in our industry, every single person that talks to one of our customers or client, they are a salesperson, so they all matter, and just letting them know that. 

 Christopher Smith   
Right. Do you have a structured sales process that you follow? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Yeah, so it would go back to the action selling. And that has, I don’t want to say it’s a script because I’m huge against a script, making it your own, but genuinely caring and asking questions right. I don’t like anybody going into any of these offices or talking to our clients and just splurting out information, because I’d rather them go in and if we’re not the right fit, tell them. Because who knows six months from now, if we are the right fit, and you never want to burn that bridge. So asking the right questions. And if you find a pain point holding that in your pocket right for the right time, then selling them on the company, right, I’m always telling them what is our story, right, what’s, what’s our story, what’s your story, but what is Nationwide’s story, selling them on that that we’re not a fly by night company, that we’ve been around, we’re doing the right things. And then the product, saving those pain points, that they asked the right questions from before, and attacking in that manner. 

 Christopher Smith   
When you came into your current role, what, how did you structure that? What were some of the first things you did? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
So training with the team and discussing, because I’ve never been mentioned before, and I would like to, I don’t want to say they were lone wolves, but they just kind of went out like they had results, right, and they were performing, but there wasn’t much structure. And I mean even stuff with, well we have bi-weekly team calls that we just talk about, we talk about our wins, our losses, and how you’re going to add value this week. And it’s, it’s very clear, I always tell him I said guys work, people lie, words lie numbers don’t lie. And if we’re talking bi-weekly and you don’t have a good list of wins and hopefully losses, then you’re not out there working. So that structure there, and then just being open, right, always having an open door to hey, how can I help you. Like I told you, I love being in the field too,  so I always say like, invite me. I want to be there, I might not talk very much, but it’s weird how saying VP of Sales is gonna be there really does open up some doors. I might not even talk very much while I’m there, but it does open up some doors for the team. 

Christopher Smith   
Is it hard to be quiet on those calls? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
You know, it depends on the meeting, right, because sometimes I see it going a different route, and like I told you, I’m learning to in biting my tongue. But I do you think the team does a really good job, but sometimes I’ve got to reel it back in. These doctors like to get off track and then our whole lunch or meeting can go a totally different way. So I had a boss before in the past that I was the rep and he was doing the same thing, just sometimes I feel like I’m out there, they’re fishing, we’re in these meetings, then it gets sidetracked and I’ll just reel it back in. And it’s a hard stop sometimes and I see the doctor think like, why did he just like interrupt, it’s not interrupt, but just a weird block where they’re talking about politics or something, I don’t know, but we reel it back into why we’re here.  

Christopher Smith   
Right, right. You know, I think failure is such a huge part, I really like to talk about this when I talk to sales leaders, because that is such a common part and I don’t even like to say the word failure but loss or when you lose the deal. That’s such a big part. How do you approach or incorporate the losses into your learning and, and enhancing your sales process? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Yeah, that’s a great question. So, first I would say that in our industry it’s unique in the fact that when we lose someone, it’s not done, right. There’s no contracts right, it’s six months, they could come back a year, we can gain them. And I always tell the team I’m like, listen, those are going to be your biggest and best wins, right, the people that throw you out, the people that say they hate using us, they don’t want to use us. When it comes full circle, that’s going to be your biggest champion and your biggest fan, so don’t, don’t take it personal. One of our reps, I love him to death, but he’ll take stuff personally sometimes. I’m like, “Listen, you know what, once the day is done, like you’re not seeing them anymore, right, don’t take it personal, like you don’t know what’s going on in their life in their day.” And some of my best accounts that I’ve ever had were the ones that I’m like, we’re never gonna get them. They hate me, they hate us. Don’t take it personal, but also continue to go back I stress that to the team I’m like, it’s not your first your second your third touch. Sometimes it’s 10 touches on these accounts, and you never know when you’re going to go in there and it’s going to be the perfect time, the right day for you, and they’ll also remember the way they treated you in those losses. So if they were rude or they threw you out of the office., they’re going to remember that, and when you come back and they’re smiling and you treat them nice, they’re gonna want to work with you even more. 

 Christopher Smith   
Oh yeah, yeah. I think it’s so important to have that consistency of, of demeanor and approach and reliability, that again, you’re talking, you’re building that relationship, we’re in for it for the long term, not just some short win. It’s so important. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Right. I always tell him too when you go back, add value, bring something else, right. Don’t, don’t throw all your irons in the fire the first time, always come back with something else to add to them, you never know which anchor might sync with them. 

 Christopher Smith   
Right, right. What do you look for when you’re cultivating sales leaders, what are those attributes that separates the good candidates from the ones that you pass on? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
So, honesty is huge, especially for for me and my team, right. Hard worker. I’d rather take somebody that doesn’t have the knowledge, so you can train the knowledge, but I don’t, for me personally, I don’t think you can train someone to work hard, so hard working, honest, and willing to learn. I’m a big fan of, you know, stagnant water turns moldy, right, and I don’t want my team to do that. So willing to learn and I’m, I’m always willing to learn and I want my team to do that too, right. I always tell them I will never ask you to do anything that I’m not willing to do myself and they’ve, they’ve responded well to that. They really will go out there and you know, especially now with how things have changed with us and COVID, our business is totally morphed into, not just doctors offices to hotels, resorts, airports, so on and so forth. So they’ve really taken the ball and just and run with it. 

 Christopher Smith   
Right. If someone wants to pursue that path that said hey, you know what, I really think I’d be a great sales manager or sales leader, what should they be doing to prepare themselves for that? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
I’d say taking the extra initiative, right. You can really tell when somebody just wants the extra power, right, or they really care and for me, I think a sales leader doesn’t just, obviously you want to care about the company, but I think you want to make your team and the people around you better so you can see that when you start giving them more responsibility, right, are they going to take these other reps underneath their wing, are they really going the extra mile, not just for the title or to have the jam. 

 Christopher Smith   
Right. Yep. Putting total revenue or, you know, new sales aside, what is that measure of success that you have for yourself and for your team? 

Kayleb Bowes   
I would go back to the three priorities that I told you earlier, right. I can’t put the first one on them, right, because that’s not everyone else’s priority and like and again it goes back to, to the why. What is their why? Um, but that making sure that those priorities are in line. And it’s so true that when we care and there’s things that are going on with them, you really see it transpire into their into their work that they’re doing. But I just I want a team that works hard right, we have fun right they know that we respect them and we like them. I don’t want to be any of those, they’re best friends we don’t hang out on the weekends, but they know that, hey, we’re here for you guys, right. We’re going to work hard, we’re going to make a lot of money. And we’re gonna have fun. And this is another thing I’ve told them too is this is a career for you guys. I don’t want it to just be like a stepping stone, like we’re building something great, that’s the reason why I came onto Nationwide, because I really do believe that we’ve got something great happening. And you can see it too, they’re seeing, there’s a lot, we’ve got a lot of momentum going the right way right now. 

 Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. What, how do you teach your team to keep rejection in perspective? You mentioned a little bit before about not taking it personal, but are there any specific strategies you have around that? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Um, so, one of our reps, she mentioned, I told you we have are those bi-weekly calls, then she was mentioning she hasn’t had any losses, I was like, you know what, that’s, that’s great. You know what, in two weeks, because you know what next week you might have 10 of them. And just responding and empowering the team, right, I think they’ve really done a good job of when there is rejection or there is loss, giving them the reins to make the calls, right. And it doesn’t have to all go through us like we entrust you guys we, we know that you can get this done like we’re here to help you. You don’t have to call us for, for everything, and so we’re seeing the trend that, when there is rejection, because there always is going to be it, that they’re taking the bull by the horns and they’re making the steps that we’ve kind of said like okay, so this is what you’re gonna do, and if there’s continual rejection there then they’re bringing us in and hopefully we can help. Obviously that’s not always the case, but giving, empowering our team so that they can, you know, if you need to discount here whatever that might be, that they feel like they’re empowered to make those calls. 

 Christopher Smith   
What’s the trigger you’re looking for when somebody is, like if you have a new sales manager that you’re concerned may have issues, what’s that trigger point for you to engage? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
I would say, when the team, well, you can feel energy, right, and when the team is sensing that too, right. Um, I always want our team to be treated with respect. Right. And that’s when I’m going to step in is if that’s not happening. Like we all have bad days, and they all know like if I can help, like, I’m here for it, but let’s leave it at the door. Right. I think Disney is a huge example of that. I love Disney, I love Universal, it’s great. But you go to Disney and you see the fact that none of their staff members are are having a bad day right, I can’t say the same thing about Universal, and I want the same thing with our team like we all have bad days, but you know what, like, let’s put on that face, let’s get to work, and at five o’clock like you can turn the face off right, so. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I think having a positive frame of mind is really really important at being consistent. So let’s transition to my favorite topic, CRM. Do you love it, or do you hate it? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
So you’re probably gonna love my answer. So when I was in the field, the other reps in the team would actually laugh. I hated the CRM. I hated it. I would be the guy that was like visited, right, stopped in. And I think it would go back to the growth, right, of really growing and seeing why it’s important. I like to say that I could remember who the person was at the office or remember what happened last time, but that was just me being naive, I mean CRM is so vital. I end my day as looking at two things. I look at the CRM, and I look at our numbers, every single night. And it’s just, it’s funny how it’s come full circle, because I was that stubborn rep that you were just having to like bang it in my head like, put your CRM notes in, and I just thought it was not important. Now, it’s so vital, so vital to the organization. Even something so simple as we had, you know, you have a rep go on vacation or God forbid you, you lose a rep. For the next person to fill in and be able to see those notes, it’s so important. And that’s been one of our things with this transition that we’ve been telling the team to update the CRM, we want to know all the contact information, you don’t have to write us a novel, but there should be a good working knowledge of what’s going on here for so many things: pipeline, notes, and even for them, like nobody’s good enough to remember every single office, everything that happened in the last time that you’ve been there. So it really is funny to now be in this role where I hated it for so long, and I know why it’s so important now. So it is vital to our operation. 

Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I love that. So, what’s your advice for a sales leader who has that younger version of you on their team? What’s your, when you to have sit them down and have that conversation, what’s your why that you tell them as to how you know why they should be using CRM? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
So that it’s not just about them. It’s not a, it’s not a micromanaging thing, right, that’s what I always thought that it was, hey I’m out here I’m working like, I don’t need to put all this stuff in here. So just stress that it’s not a micromanagement thing, right, it’s a, it’s a funnel, it’s a forecast thing, and for our total operation that, you know, hey, if you are ever to leave, we can pick back up where you left off, or you go on vacation and another rep’s covering for you that you can see those those notes there, that again, I stress the micromanaging thing, maybe because that was, to me that was the hurdle was I’m out here, I’m working. Why at the end of the day am I having to plug all this stuff in here? But now on the, on the back end, I see why it’s so important, and I let the team know that. 

Christopher Smith   
Oh yeah. And it’s also I think it’s a great tool. You talked a lot about being able to step in and help your team. If they’re not putting their stuff in CRM, the only way you’re going to be able to know what’s going on is to spend a whole bunch of time with them. But if they’re putting it in CRM, you can quickly scan notes and see what’s going on and, and probably engage them a lot quicker which ultimately, I think, leads to more success for them. 

Kayleb Bowes   
Absolutely, even for the losses like you brought up earlier, it’s painting me a picture as to okay you know this is maybe why we lost this client, right, like we have this issue, we didn’t address it fully. It really does paint a perfect picture for me. I mean it’s, it’s funny that now I in my days, not just looking at numbers, but I look at the CR. 

 Christopher Smith   
Oh yeah, it is. It’s funny how it just comes back to get you. As a sales leader, what’s your biggest struggle with CRM? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Um, you know what, I would say that we have a customized CRM, and there’s still kinks and things that we need to figure out and to tailor it to the team and we’re working on that now. And there’s more things that I’ve said like, we have the open communication with the team, like what do you need, right. So we’ve got that, but now it’s, it’s putting it into place to make their life a little bit easier. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah, that’s great. Have you ever experienced a CRM implementation, you ever used a tool where it just flat out sucked? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Yes, in my, my first job, we had used Salesforce. And again, I had never been a fan of any of them, but we switched over to, oh gosh, it’s Oracle’s. You probably know. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah, I try not to mention any names but yeah, we get it. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Yeah, exactly. We switched over and it was a nightmare. From day one, management hated it, we hated it. And very quickly we were, we were back to, to where we were. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah, yeah. That’s tough. It’s tough and I was wondering why like what was behind. What were the pain points that caused the switch. And it’s always, it’s fascinating to listen to those and then you guys are lucky to be able to pull it back though, a lot of people have to suffer a lot longer. 

Kayleb Bowes   
Oh they quickly switched us back and it didn’t take long. They, they saw the headaches that we were having and it was a it was a quick transition, transitioned in, transitioned out. 

 Christopher Smith   
Yeah, what are your keys to success for a CRM implementation? 

Kayleb Bowes   
So I would say having all your ducks in a row beforehand, right. The training is there that everything’s been carried over from before, that there is no, no lag there because that’s, that’s the worst thing for our team in the field, right, they have all those notes and then poof, it’s in the cloud, they don’t have it anymore. And then training. The last thing I want to do with the team is throw something else on them when they’ve already got, they’re juggling 100 things. Now here’s this, and they don’t know how to utilize it, so that’s something that we’re working on as a company now of hey, when we’re implementing new products and new stuff, we’ve got to train the team on this, and it’s the same thing with CRM.  

 Christopher Smith   
Yep.  

Kayleb Bowes   
You want them to use it, they got to know how to effectively use it. 

 Christopher Smith   
Exactly. And to me it should be ongoing as well. It’s not something that, oh we did our training when we went live and that’s the last training they have on it, should be on a regular cadence of, hey let’s just revisit this part or revisit that or here’s a best practice all structured around process. I think it’s very important. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Absolutely.  

 Christopher Smith   
Yep, we’re coming up on the end here, of, of Sales Lead Dog. I really appreciate you coming on the show and sharing your, your experiences around sales and CRM. If, Kayleb, if people want to reach out and connect with you, what’s the best way for that to happen? 

 Kayleb Bowes   
So LinkedIn is definitely one or you could reach, reach me from the our website, right,  Nationwidelabtesting.com, and you can reach out to me there. 

 Christopher Smith   
That’s awesome. Thank you so much for coming on Sales Lead Dog. I really, really appreciate it. It’s been great chatting with you. 

 Kayleb Bowes   
Chris, happy to, happy to be here. Thanks for hosting me. 

 Christopher Smith   
You bet. 

 Outro 
As we end this discussion on Sales Lead Dog, be sure to subscribe to catch all our episodes on social media. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram. Watch the videos on YouTube, and you can also find our episodes on our website at Empellorcrm.com/salesleaddog. Sales Lead Dog is supported by Empellor CRM, delivering objectively better CRM for business guaranteed. 

Quotes

  • “So I would say that there’s not one way to be successful in a sales career, right. I’m not to go off script, but to be genuine. I think that’s something that you can’t teach — to be genuine and to kind of create your own style.” (8:50-9:05)
  • “Be Genuine and Create Your Own Style.” (12:30-12:34)
  • “I’d rather take somebody that doesn’t have the knowledge, so you can train the knowledge but I don’t. for me personally I don’t think you can train someone to work hard…” (25:06-25-15)
  • “I would go back to the three priorities that I told you earlier, right, I can’t put the first one on them right because that’s not everyone else’s priority… again it goes back to, to the why, what is their why?” (26:55-27:06)

Links

Nationwide Laboratory Services (nationwidelabtesting.com)
Nationwide Laboratory Services: Overview | LinkedIn
Kayleb Bowes | LinkedIn

 

Follow Empellor CRM on LinkedIn: Empellor CRM LinkedIn

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